mass shooting

The jumble of shoes abandoned by people fleeing for their lives early Sunday morning has been removed from the parking lot of Ned Pepper’s bar. Near the front door, flowers and candles are piling up. Heart-shaped wreaths honoring the victims stand a few feet away.

The Dayton community is in mourning after 9 people were killed and over 30 injured in Sunday’s mass shooting.

Fifth street is typically empty on Mondays because most businesses are closed. But today,  reporters from all over the country pace on the sidewalks. TV news trucks hum on both sides of the street.

In the wake of Sunday morning's deadly shooting in Dayton's historic Oregon District, Community Blood Center is holding a blood drive to replenish supplies.

Updated at 9:15 p.m. ET

As national and local leaders grapple with the nation's raw emotions over the mass shootings in El Paso and Dayton, the mayor of El Paso, Dee Margo, confirmed that President Trump will visit his city on Wednesday.

Updated at 5:01 p.m. ET

President Trump, responding Monday to the deadly weekend shootings in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio, that killed 31 people, condemned white supremacy and called for the death penalty for mass murderers and domestic terrorists.

Speaking at the White House, Trump said the nation is "overcome with shock, horror and sorrow."

This undated photo provided by the Dayton Police Department shows Connor Betts. The 24-year-old masked gunman in body armor opened fire early Sunday, Aug. 4, 2019 in Dayton's Oregon District.
Dayton Police Department

High school classmates of the gunman who killed nine people early Sunday in Dayton, say he was suspended for compiling a "hit list" of those he wanted to kill and a "rape list" of girls he wanted to sexually assault.

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine, left, speaks alongside Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley, right, during a vigil at the scene of a mass shooting, Sunday, Aug. 4, 2019, in Dayton.
John Minchillo / AP

Government leaders from around the state extended their condolences to the families and friends who lost loved ones during the mass shooting in Dayton, while some top leaders called for legislation to prevent such an attack in the future.

It took about 30 seconds to bring down the gunman who killed nine people and injured 27 others in a crowded section of downtown Dayton, Ohio, early on Sunday morning — just hours after another scene of violence in the Texas city of El Paso.

Police have identified the nine people who were killed after a shooter fired dozens of rounds into a busy street in Dayton, Ohio, early Sunday morning.

The people who died range in age from 22 to 57, and they include four women and five men. Police say the attacker, who was killed at the scene, is 24-year-old Connor Betts. They identified one of the victims as his 22-year-old sister, Megan Betts.

Updated 4 p.m. ET

The shooter behind the grisly mass shooting that left 20 people dead and 26 wounded at an El Paso, Texas, Walmart on Saturday morning has been identified by officials as 21-year-old Patrick Crusius of Allen, Texas.

State prosecutors in El Paso announced on Sunday that they will pursue the death penalty against Crusius.

This is a developing story that will be updated.

UPDATE 5:02 PM

Police are continuing to investigate a mass shooting in Dayton’s Oregon district overnight. 9 people were killed and 27 others were injured when a 24-year-old Bellbrook man opened fire outside Ned Peppers bar.

Police say the gunman drove downtown with his sister, who was later killed in the shooting. He wore body armour, ear protection, and a mask. He carried out the attack with an assault rifle that was purchased online.

Police have identified 24-year-old white male Connor Betts from Bellbrook, Ohio, as the shooter who claimed nine lives and injured 27 others in Dayton, Ohio, early on Sunday morning.

Among the nine dead was the shooter's sister, Megan Betts, 22, said Lt. Col. Matt Carper at a news conference Sunday.

Updated Sunday at 11 a.m. ET

Twenty people are dead and 26 wounded after a mass shooting at an El Paso, Texas, Walmart on Saturday morning, according to state and local authorities.

Speaking at a news conference, Gov. Greg Abbott said that what should have been a leisurely day of shopping "turned into one of the most deadly days in the history of Texas."

"We pray that God will be with those who've been harmed in any way," he added.

Lisa Marie Pane / AP

Gov. Mike DeWine says he’s deeply concerned about attacks at houses of worship, including at a synagogue in California this weekend. That has him looking into a specific type of gun legislation, the so-called "red flag" bill, which failed to move in the Republican-dominated legislature last year.

The U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom has released its annual report in the aftermath of attacks on mosques in New Zealand, churches in Sri Lanka and synagogues in the United States.

Three of the four people killed inside a West Chester Township apartment this weekend were members of the Sikh Gurdwara Temple on Tylersville Road. The temple's executive committee president, Jasminder Singh, says he was shocked when he learned of the deaths.

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