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mass incarceration

Gov. Mike DeWine, with Dean Christopher Peters of the University of Akron School of Law behind him, announces his expedited pardon process at Ohio State.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

Gov. Mike DeWine says he wants to make it easier and quicker for people who have long-ago criminal convictions to be considered for pardons.

In this Oct. 30, 2019 photo, Joshua Bessey discusses what happened to him in September at the Gallia County Jail in southern Ohio, during an interview in Vinton, Ohio.
Mark Gillispie / Associated Press

Families of inmates who died or were seriously injured at a small Ohio county jail in the last year are seeking answers about what happened to their loved ones.

The 2020 Census will be conducted next year. Many citizens will be counted in the places where they’ve grown up and currently live.

But if you’re incarcerated, you may be counted as a resident of the county in which you’re imprisoned and not the one you’re actually from.

That practice is known as prison gerrymandering. It can inflate the population of a county with a large prison population, giving more power to the people who vote there.

Donna McMullen holds a photo of her daughter, Jessica, who died in September.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

“That’s my mommy, look!” Three-year old Adalynn McMullen points a little dimpled finger at a collage of photos on a trifold board.

The photos show her mom, Jessica McMullen, over the years – from when she was in diapers to just a few years ago, holding Adalynn on her lap.

Gabe Rosenberg / WOsu

The Senate Judiciary Committee has approved changes to a bill, SB18, that would ban prison guards from shackling pregnant inmates.

Alisha Floyd and her son Chance were part of the Ohio Reformatory for Women's ABC Program.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

Thursday marks the grand opening of a new home for the Ohio Reformatory for Women's Achieving Baby Care Success program (ABC). 

How Incarceration, Economic Decline Affect Opioid Deaths

Aug 26, 2019

As officials look for ways to stem the opioid epidemic, a lot of effort has been put into limiting narcotic prescriptions. But new research suggests underlying social issues -- like incarceration and poverty -- are linked to overdose deaths. 

People returning to Dayton from incarceration will now have access to more help reentering society. Montgomery County officials Wednesday cut the ribbon on a new, dedicated Reentry Training Center offering intensive job-preparation classes and job placement, housing and other assistance.

This Jan. 8, 2001. file photo shows the Ohio State Penitentiary (OSP) in Youngstown, Ohio, the state's highest security prison.
Tony Dejak / Associated Press

An Ohio State University analysis of state, county and federal data suggests racial disparities in criminal sentencing have declined. 

Nearly half the people admitted to state prisons in the U.S. are there because of violations of probation or parole, according to a new nationwide study that highlights the personal and economic costs of the practice.

The Council of State Governments Justice Center said the majority of these violations are for "minor infractions," such as failing a drug test or missing a curfew. Those so-called technical violations cost states $2.8 billion every year, the report says.

Jamie Monghan is a prisoner at the Ohio Reformatory for Women. She lives in the Tapestry Unit for women in addiction recovery.
Gabe Rosenberg / WOSU

Heroin ran Stephanie Pollock's life. She woke up in the morning with heroin on her mind, her day revolved around it, and everything else including her three kids and her own well-being paled in comparison.

James Sutton / Unsplash

A typical phone call usually doesn't cost much, if anything. But in jails and prisons, inmates must pay to use phones to stay in touch with loved ones and their lawyers. These prices can vary dramatically based on where someone is incarcerated.

Southern Ohio Correctional Facility in Lucasville, Ohio.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Discrepancies in sentencing among Ohio inmates inspired a recent documentary on the inequities of the U.S. justice system.

A report from the American Civil Liberties Union of Ohio says nearly one in eight bills introduced by state lawmakers either creates a new crime or expands sentences. But the leader in the Senate is pushing back on claims that lawmakers are to blame.

Once again, the ACLU of Ohio is pushing for criminal justice reform with a new report on what it calls the “Statehouse to prison pipeline”. 

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