manufacturing

The only high school in my hometown — Campbell, Ohio — was built on a hilltop just east of Youngstown.

Behind our football field, the earth sloped away, down to the Mahoning River valley where the Youngstown Sheet & Tube steel mills stretched out for miles.

Our school, our small town, the gritty air we breathed — they were inseparable from those blast furnaces.

For three generations of Campbell guys, seeking work at the mill was almost automatic. And smart: You were guaranteed great pay and union benefits.

Jeff St. Clair / WKSU

A Cleveland manufacturer says the tariffs imposed against imported steel are making it harder to do business in the U.S. It's hoping for a quick resolution of trade disputes with suppliers.

The Nippon Steel and Sumitomo Metal plant in Kamaishi Japan.
Adrian Ma / Ideastream

Kamaishi, Japan, may be a long way from Cleveland, but both cities have a lot in common.

Procter & Gamble says it plans to ramp up the number of robots it has to a total of 5,000 in the next five years. It now has 3,000, up from 1,000 in 2013. Managers say the reason for the robotic increase is due to advances in vision and gripping, as well as robots that can work alongside people.

As seen in recent weeks, how companies view President Trump's tariffs on foreign steel and aluminum depends a lot on what business they're in. 

A solar farm in Shelby, Ohio.
Thomas R Machnitzki

A study is urging Ohio leaders and policymakers to support clean and alternative energy before it’s too late. One researcher says there’s a ticking clock on the economic benefit the state could harness.

Honda Accords are constructed at the car maker's factory in Marysville.
Steve Brown / WOSU

The number of manufacturing jobs in Ohio has slowly ticked up in recent months, but a new report finds several trends that could undermine the future of the industry.

skeeze / Pixabay

Ohio manufacturers are giving mixed responses to tariffs that President Trump says he’ll place on imported steel and aluminum.

Courtesy of Westie Productions

The city of Mount Vernon and workers at a local Siemens plant suffered a major blow this week with news that the energy company is closing the location, a move expected to affect about 400 workers.

construction workers
Pixabay

Construction was among the industries that saw the most job growth in Ohio last year, according to state employment data published Wednesday by the U.S. Labor Department.

Whirlpool washing machines
Flickr Creative Commons

A residential washing machine manufacturer with a major Ohio presence is celebrating President Trump's plan to place tariffs on imported washers and solar panels.

Tim Rudell / WKSU

Union Metal in Canton gave 300-plus workers the word last month that the plant is closing for good this month, and they’re all out of work. Ohio is offering a special set of information sessions to help the employees find something new.

Tiger Images / Shutterstock

Manufacturing jobs may be declining, but at least two Northeast Ohio industries are expected to buck the trend in 2018.

New data from the Census Bureau's Annual Survey of Manufactures rank Ohio in the top three states for manufacturing employment, behind California and Texas.

The number of Ohioans working in manufacturing has risen each year since the Great Recession ended. Employment peaked in 2015 at about 650,000. Last year it dropped by 10,000. But the state still leads manufacturing employment in the Midwest. Nationally, Ohio ranked 17th in terms of employment growth since 2010. Employment grew 10 percent during that time.

At the Novelis plant in New York, machines are preparing aluminum rolls for manufacturing.

The Oswego Co. plant processes the metal for companies like Ford, Toyota and General Motors. And most of its aluminum comes from Canada.


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