Managed Care

Valeri Potapova / Shutterstock

On Sunday, the state will officially move providers of behavioral health services for low-income Ohioans into Medicaid managed care.

State and county leaders have been trying to figure out how to patch up budget holes that opened up when the federal government took away the ability to tax Medicaid managed care providers. Lawmakers reached a compromise but falls far short of filling the gap.

COTA bus in downtown Columbus
WOSU

Ohio lawmakers are still trying to come up with a new plan to replace hundreds of millions of dollars in revenue that public transit agencies and counties lost in the last state budget. The money will be running out earlier than anticipated.

Ohio Budget Director Tim Keen (from left), House Speaker Cliff Rosenberger, Governor John Kasich and Senate President Larry Obhof discuss changes to the state budget.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

State lawmakers overrode six of Gov. John Kasich’s 47 budget vetoes. But one headline-making veto may survive – the one that stops a plan to ask the federal government to increase the tax on managed-care organizations. 

Lawmakers and the Kasich administration have gone back and forth on a budget issue that would change the way people with long term health problems would receive medical care. That provision is still on the table as the Senate works to craft their final draft of the budget bill.