Lyft

A Lyft scooter in Austin, Texas. The scooters are leaving Columbus this week.
Tony Webster / Flickr

Starting Saturday, Lyft scooters will no longer be available in Columbus, just months after coming to the city. The company is also leaving Nashville and San Antonio.  

Lyft and Uber are reportedly asking that Ohio keep license plates on the front of vehicles. The Associated Press reports the ride-hailing companies say it's a safety measure.

Amazon Prime delivery trucks.
Todd Van Hoosear / Flickr

The city of Columbus announced a new program this week to help manage traffic flow around deliveries. It’s working with mobility company curbFlow to coordinate pickup and drop-off activity.

Lyft is facing a flood of lawsuits from women around the country who say the ride-hailing company has known for years — and failed to stop — what they describe as an epidemic of sexual assault and rape involving some of its drivers.

"This is out of control. And this needs to stop," says attorney Laurel Simes, a partner in a San Francisco firm representing several dozen women who are suing the company.

Updated at 11:06 p.m. ET

Ahead of Uber's initial public offering, drivers for Uber, Lyft and other ride-hailing companies went on strike Wednesday, turning off the apps as they flex their collective muscles to say: What about us?

Drivers in 10 cities across the country took action Wednesday to draw attention to what they say are decreasing wages for drivers and a distressing lack of job security — and some are calling on passengers to temporarily boycott the ride-hailing services, too.

Forty-year-old local resident Mike, checked his cell phone recently, just outside the main entrance to St. Vincent Charity Medical Center, while waiting for an Uber car to pull up.

“Hi I’m Michael,” he said as he greeted the Uber driver before jumping into the back seat of the dark grey sedan.

It's easy enough for people who live in cities to hail a ride, either from a taxi or a service like Uber or Lyft. There's plenty of demand, and plenty of drivers. A startup is trying to bring a similar service to rural America, but it has required some creative thinking.

The town of Van Wert sits on the western edge of Ohio. It's a stretch of flat farm country punctuated with grain silos and a stone castle that's listed as the nation's first county public library.

Google / Creative Commons

The Ohio Senate is considering a bill that would create one set of statewide regulations for ride-sharing services such as Uber and Lyft.