long term care

Jacqueline McFarquhar's mom, Beryline Hillaire, celebrating her 80th birthday at the adult day care center Active Day.
Courtesy of Jacqueline McFarquhar

Jacqueline McFarquhar’s mom, Beryline Hillaire, is 80 years old and has Alzheimer’s. For the last two years, Hillaire's been going to Active Day, an adult day care center near Cincinnati.

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine
Office of Gov. Mike DeWine

Ohio saw the highest number of deaths from COVID-19 in a single day since May, Gov. Mike DeWine announced Tuesday.

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine gives a press conference from his home in Cedarville.
Office of Gov. Mike DeWine

Gov. Mike DeWine on Thurday set a reopening date of senior centers and adult day centers for September 21 and laid out several measures the facilities will have to follow.

Paige Pfleger / WOSU

A Franklin County nursing home has the largest number of cumulative COVID-19 cases of any long-term care facility in the state. That’s because it is one of several facilities voluntarily admitting COVID-19 patients.

No one has been more acutely affected by the pandemic than people who live in nursing homes and their families.

The state banned visitors four months ago as nursing home deaths spiked.

Today, outdoor visits are supposed to resume. But many facilities have told visitors it’s still not safe.

The nation’s nursing homes lobbying group has written to Ohio’s Mike DeWine and other governors, warning that without action now there will be more outbreaks, especially if visitors are allowed back in to see loved ones after months away.

Nearly three quarters of all confirmed COVID-19 deaths in Ohio have been in nursing homes. Ohio National Guard personnel have been helping with testing in long term care facilities, but the funding for them to continue that and other pandemic related missions runs out in a month.

Gov. Mike DeWine at his daily coronavirus press conference on Sunday, March 23, 2020.
Office of Gov. Mike DeWine

Gov. Mike DeWine announced that Ohio's nursing homes will be allowed to have outdoor visitors again, beginning July 20. It will be the first time in four months that many long-term care residents will be able to see family members in person.

Elderly person in a nursing home.
Sabine van Erp / Pixabay

As Gov. Mike DeWine loosens visitation rules at nursing homes and assisted living facilities, where the coronavirus pandemic has hit hardest, mental health professionals are counseling residents to help ease their stress.

Some of Ohio's long-term care facilities began outdoor visitation Monday.

After nearly three months, residents in assisted living facilities and intermediate care facilities for individuals with developmental disabilities can now visit with their family members outdoors.

“This is such a sweet day, in my mind,” said Nancy Sutula, Vice President of Residential Services at Menorah Park in Beachwood. “Residents are finally being able to physically see their family members and spend some quality time with them.”

Coronavirus In Ohio: Families Weigh Risks Of Sending Loved Ones To Nursing Homes

May 29, 2020
A sign at the Mill Run nursing home in Hilliard.
Ryan Hitchcock / WOSU

In early March, just as Ohioans were learning about the first cases of novel coronavirus in the state, Anna Bondar’s grandfather fell at his Cleveland home. Luckily, the 92-year old, who lives with dementia, wasn’t injured badly.

The tight-knit family started to discuss the possibility of a nursing home, though they had serious reservations.

Gov. Mike DeWine is beginning to loosen restrictions on assisted living facilities and homes for the developmentally disabled.

Starting June 8, residents at those two types of long-term care facilities can meet with visitors outdoors, the governor announced Thursday.

Rebecca Roth reviews applications for election ballots at the Cuyahoga County Board of Elections, Wednesday, April 22, 2020, in Cleveland.
Tony Dejak / Associated Press

In this week's episode of Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU, hosts Mike Thompson and Steve Brown discuss President Trump's inaccurate claim that mail-in ballots are ripe for fraud. Michael McDonald, a political science professor at the University of Florida, joins the show.

The Ohio National Guard will deploy across the state beginning this week to help expand COVID-19 testing at Ohio’s 960 nursing homes. Gov. Mike DeWine announced the effort during his regular coronavirus briefing.

More than three quarters of confirmed COVID-19 deaths in Ohio have come from nursing homes. This week’s total is a 30% increase from a week ago.

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