law enforcement

In 1969, Philip Zimbardo, a psychologist from Stanford University, ran an interesting field study. He abandoned two cars in two very different places: one in a mostly poor, crime-ridden section of New York City, and the other in a fairly affluent neighborhood of Palo Alto, Calif. Both cars were left without license plates and parked with their hoods up.

Wikimedia Commons

Walmart, the world’s largest retailer, has long been criticized for its massive buying power and lower prices that can drive smaller stores out of business. Now some activists are accusing the retailer of relying too much on local police for security at a store in Whitehall, and others around the country.

But Whitehall Police disagree.

Jason Cisneroz, a community service officer in Houston, is troubled. His job in the nation's fourth largest city is to forge good relations between the police and Hispanic immigrants, a population typically wary of blue uniforms.

"A couple of days ago there was a witness to a burglary of a motor vehicle," he said. "She saw the suspects run to a certain place and with items they stole from a car, but she was afraid to come to police, she was in fear they would ask for her papers."

Body cameras are spreading fast through American policing, and they're generating an ocean of video. Axon, a company that provides secure cloud storage for police departments, says it has received more than 4 million hours' worth of video uploads from its clients.

Akron is wrapping up another police recruiting drive amidst the pressure of retirements and a national distrust separating police and some communities. 

On a Wednesday afternoon, about 20 people who are considering applying to become Akron police officers show up for an information session.

The instructor positions himself on the floor: “Situps are a little more difficult..."

Demonstrating the physical fitness has been part of the police test has been part these kinds of sessions for decades. But at this one, as much time is devoted to questions like this this:

Esther Honig / WOSU

With a rising homicide rate, Columbus Police Chief Kim Jacobs says violent crime in the city will get more attention this summer as officers ramp up their efforts in vulnerable neighborhoods.  

Flickr

A ceremony was held Thursday honoring five Ohio officers, including two from Central Ohio, who died last year in the line of duty. 

Nick Houser

A Columbus Police officer known as "the dancing cop" to some because of his community policing efforts, will take his message back to Harvard University next week.

Adora Namigadde

Columbus police say they're frustrated that nine victims of a Sunday morning shooting in South Linden aren’t cooperating in the investigation. But people in the neighborhood say the unwillingness to work with the police shouldn't be surprising.

Ohio Attorney General's Office

Authorities in Licking County say they've made an arrest in the unsolved slaying of a Columbus woman 26 years ago.

Ohio State Highway Patrol cruiser driving
Raymond Clarke / Flickr

A state certification process will require that all Ohio police departments for the first time collect data on the race and gender of people they pull over in traffic stops or take aside for questioning.

Civil forfeiture is when the government seizes someone’s property. In Ohio, it can happen without criminal charges.
Google / Creative Commons

It will be harder for police, prosecutors and the government to seize private property in Ohio under a new bill signed into law. 

UPR.org

After outfitting just 12 Columbus Police officers with body-worn cameras in 2016, Mayor Andrew Ginther said in a press conference Thursday that 70 officers in the department's traffic bureau are scheduled to wear the cameras by the end of January.

Debbie Holmes

A new Franklin County Sheriff will take over on January 2: Dallas Baldwin, a retired Lieutenant with the Columbus Police Department.

Retired architect Tom Chudzinski had been travelling the western U.S. in his motor home when he awoke one night to local sheriff's deputies knocking on his door in New Mexico.

Smelling alcohol on Chudzinski's breath, the officers arrested him on the suspicion that he had crashed his RV into a parked vehicle at a nearby truck stop. Although they hadn't seen him driving, they booked him into an Albuquerque jail.

Chudzinski couldn't make bail, so he remained behind bars for 34 days.

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