Larry Obhof

Ohio Senate Republicans made sweeping changes to the House version of the state budget, including larger tax cuts and restored tax breaks.

Vancouver Film School / Flickr

There’s a fight brewing over a small tax credit cut in the Ohio House version of the two-year state budget.

A federal court has denied Ohio’s request to delay new congressional map drawing. The request was filed after the court ruled that the current district lines are gerrymandered to benefit Republicans. The state says it’s still looking to the U.S. Supreme Court to stay the decision pending its appeal. But a top Ohio Democrat says now is the time for the state to get the ball rolling on drawing the new congressional districts. 

Gov. Mike DeWine, center, speaks between Ohio Senate President Larry Obhof, left, and Ohio House Speaker Larry Householder during the Ohio State of the State address at the Ohio Statehouse in Columbus, Ohio, Tuesday, March 5, 2019.
Paul Vernon / Associated Press

State lawmakers have been advised by their economic researchers to cut the spending in Gov. Mike DeWine’s budget. But they may also add income tax cuts into the House version of the budget set to be released on Wednesday, something that DeWine deliberately left out.

Students in the classroom
Columbus Neighborhoods / WOSU

Lawmakers are looking over several different bills that would revise the way the state handles school districts in academic distress. There seems to be a consensus that changes are needed, but there seems to be a debate on exactly how to go about it.

Ohio Attorney General and Republican gubernatorial candidate Mike DeWine reviews his prepared comments ahead of a primary election night event, Tuesday, May 8, 2018, in Columbus, Ohio.
Bryan Woolston / Associated Press

It’s taken eight years and many hours of testimony, but the six-week abortion ban known as the “Heartbeat Bill” has been signed into law.

highway in Columbus
Gabe Rosenberg / WOSU

Members of the Ohio House and Senate reached a deal to raise the gas tax by 10.5 cents beginning in July. The lawmakers say that will be enough to help Ohio close a funding gap for construction on the state's roads and bridges.

gas pump
David Zalubowski / Associated Press

The deadline for a new state transportation budget with a gas tax hike came and went at midnight—without a new spending plan being signed. Lawmakers are coming back to the Statehouse this week hoping to work it out.

Ohio Senate President Larry Obhof (R-Medina)
Ohio Senate

As lawmakers are working out differences in their transportation budgets, there’s one thing in the Senate’s version that doesn’t seem to have anything to do with transportation: a change in a tax credit designed for low-income people. It’s being tied to the increase in the gas tax.

The Republican Senate president is saying the competing transportation budget proposals are closer than they appear as lawmakers go into the final week of negotiations before the deadline to pass a new budget.

Ohio Senate President Larry Obhof
Ohio Senate

The president of the Ohio Senate doesn’t think lawmakers infringed on cities’ rights with legislation that supersedes local gun ordinances and gives citizens the right to challenge those local laws in court.

gas pump
David Zalubowski / Associated Press

Republican leaders in the Ohio Senate have hinted at some possible changes to the transportation budget plan that could spark a debate among the Senate, House and governor's office.

Abortion protesters at the Ohio Statehouse.
Jo Ingles / Statehouse News Bureau

The Ohio Senate has passed the so-called “Heartbeat Bill,” SB 23, which bans an abortion when a viable heartbeat is detected, which can be as early as six weeks. If passed, it would be one of the most restrictive abortion measures in the country.

Gov. Mike DeWine’s proposed 18-cent hike in the gas tax is still before state lawmakers. They would have to approve it as part of the transportation budget, which must be signed into law by March 31.

Advocates for renewable and alternative energy sources are calling on Ohio lawmakers to create consistency when it comes to the state's green energy policies. They say Ohio falls behind other states when legislators keep revisiting the renewable energy standards.

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