Kamala Harris

For four nights, speakers at the Republican National Convention pilloried Democrat Joe Biden over his alleged weakness on crime and painted a dystopian future if he were to be elected in November.

Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden and his running mate Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., watch fireworks during the fourth day of the Democratic National Convention, Thursday, Aug. 20.
Andrew Harnik / Associated Press

In this week's episode of Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU, host Steve Brown discusses how the Democratic National Convention worked without the crowds of cheering delegates. Ohio State University political scientist Paul Beck joins the show.

When Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) accepts the Democratic vice presidential nomination Wednesday night, she becomes the first graduate of a historically Black college or university (HBCU) to join a major party ticket. That's a point of pride for many HBCUs, their students and alumni.

DNC Live Coverage: Wednesday, Aug. 19

Aug 17, 2020

Follow live updates and analysis of the Democratic National Convention. Wednesday's speakers include House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and former President Barack Obama.

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Updated at 8:15 p.m. ET

President Trump stoked an untrue conspiracy theory being promoted by supporters — and his campaign — that Sen. Kamala Harris of California is not eligible for the vice presidency.

The Democrat was born in California and therefore qualifies for the job.

Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden's running mate Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., speaks during a campaign event at Alexis Dupont High School in Wilmington, Del., Wednesday, Aug. 12, 2020.
Carolyn Kaster / Associated Press

In this week's episode of Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU, hosts Mike Thompson and Steve Brown discuss likely Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden's choice of Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) as his running mate. Ohio State University professor Wendy Smooth joins the show.

National Politics With Ken Rudin

Aug 13, 2020
Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden's running mate Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., speaks during a campaign event at Alexis Dupont High School in Wilmington, Del., Wednesday, Aug. 12, 2020.
Carolyn Kaster / Associated Press

The presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden on Wednesday revealed a historic pick for his running mate: Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.). She’s a former foe in the primary battleground, but the two merged this week to rally against Republican President Donald Trump.

Joe Biden picked California Sen. Kamala Harris to be his vice presidential running mate.

It's a historic pick. But there's a lot more to it than that.

Here are five takeaways:

1. Biden picking Harris is a statement on what it means to be American.

Biden picking Harris as his running mate is historic. No Black or South Asian American woman has ever been on a major-party ticket in U.S. history. Black voters, especially Black women, are pillars of the Democratic Party and were key to Biden's victory in the contest for the nomination.

Updated at 7 p.m. ET

Former Vice President Joe Biden, the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee, has picked Sen. Kamala Harris of California as his running mate.

The selection will make Harris the third woman and first Black and first Asian American candidate to be nominated for vice president by a major political party.

Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden speaks at a campaign event in Columbus on Tuesday, March 10, 2020.
Paul Vernon / AP

A little over two weeks before the Democratic National Convention meets mostly virtually, Ohio Democrats held their own virtual convention this weekend and heard presentations from the party’s likely nominee and the woman who may be his running mate.

When news broke that California Sen. Kamala Harris was dropping out of the presidential race on Tuesday, some fellow Democratic candidates quickly began ringing alarm bells. Harris was the only nonwhite candidate to have qualified for the next presidential debate on Dec. 19.

"What we're staring at is a DNC debate stage in a few days with no people of color on it, that does not reflect the diversity of our party or our country," former Housing Secretary Julián Castro said. "We need to do better than that."

Updated at 3:25 p.m. ET

California Sen. Kamala Harris is dropping out of the presidential race, citing a lack of funds. She informed her campaign staff of the decision on a conference call and later sent an email to supporters, in which she wrote "my campaign for president simply doesn't have the financial resources we need to continue."

Former Vice President Joe Biden and Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., participate in the second of two Democratic presidential primary debates hosted by CNN Wednesday, July 31, 2019,
Paul Sancya / Associated Press

In this week's episode of Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU, hosts Mike Thompson and Steve Brown discuss the most recent Democratic presidential debates. Thomas Wood, a political scientist at Ohio State University, joins the show.

Updated at 1 p.m. ET

The second night of the Democratic debates in Detroit did not stray from its predicted script: It was open season on front-runner Joe Biden right from the start.

But it was also something of a free-for-all, with every candidate for himself or herself. And the intensity and outcome of the exchanges may have come as a surprise to some of the people onstage.

The first leg of the second round of Democratic presidential debates is over, and now it's on to Night 2.

Center stage features former Vice President Joe Biden, who has a lot on the line. Sen. Cory Booker of New Jersey has been promising attacks on Biden's racial justice record, and Biden is promising to not be as "polite" as he was in the last debate. Night 1 also drew a bold line between moderates and progressives onstage.

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