Kamala Harris | WOSU Radio

Kamala Harris

Updated at 1:55 p.m. ET

California Sen. Kamala Harris is dropping out of the presidential race, citing a lack of funds. She informed staff of her decision on a conference call and later sent an email to supporters, in which she wrote "my campaign for president simply doesn't have the financial resources we need to continue."

"I'm not a billionaire," she added. "I can't fund my own campaign. And as the campaign has gone on, it's become harder and harder to raise the money we need to compete."

Former Vice President Joe Biden and Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., participate in the second of two Democratic presidential primary debates hosted by CNN Wednesday, July 31, 2019,
Paul Sancya / Associated Press

In this week's episode of Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU, hosts Mike Thompson and Steve Brown discuss the most recent Democratic presidential debates. Thomas Wood, a political scientist at Ohio State University, joins the show.

Updated at 1 p.m. ET

The second night of the Democratic debates in Detroit did not stray from its predicted script: It was open season on front-runner Joe Biden right from the start.

But it was also something of a free-for-all, with every candidate for himself or herself. And the intensity and outcome of the exchanges may have come as a surprise to some of the people onstage.

The first leg of the second round of Democratic presidential debates is over, and now it's on to Night 2.

Center stage features former Vice President Joe Biden, who has a lot on the line. Sen. Cory Booker of New Jersey has been promising attacks on Biden's racial justice record, and Biden is promising to not be as "polite" as he was in the last debate. Night 1 also drew a bold line between moderates and progressives onstage.

Former Vice President Joe Biden (left) and President Donald Trump (right)
Associated Press

A new Quinnipiac University Poll shows Democratic Former Vice President Joe Biden is the only Democrat in the race who would beat Republican President Donald Trump if the election were held today.

PBS NewsHour via / YouTube

Updated at 4:57 p.m. ET

Now that the 2020 Democratic field is pretty much set (barring a last-minute Stacey Abrams or John Kerry bid) with former Vice President Joe Biden getting in Thursday, let's look at what we've learned so far about the field and what to watch for going forward:

1. How far does name identification go? Biden is a huge boulder in the lake, and his entry into the presidential campaign is sending ripples throughout the primary field. So far, he leads the pack. That's largely a product of the fact that people know the former vice president and recognize his name.

Updated at 6:05 p.m. ET

Eight Democratic presidential candidates faced the same basic question today in Houston: Why should women of color vote for them?

The first-ever She The People Presidential Forum — organized by and centered on questions from women of color — served as a repeated reminder of the key role that minority women play in Democratic politics.

Updated Wednesday at 2:15 p.m.

As more 2020 Democrats report their fundraising totals, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders remains ahead in the cash race with the $18.2 million he received from more than 500,000 donors since he entered the presidential campaign in February.

Updated at 9:10 a.m. ET

California Sen. Kamala Harris is running for president in 2020. The first-term Democratic senator made the announcement on ABC's Good Morning America Monday morning.

"I love my country, and this is a moment in time that I feel a sense of responsibility to fight for the best of who we are," Harris said.

Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., and Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., listen as Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., speaks during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh, Friday, Sept. 28, 2018, on Capitol Hill in Washington.
Andrew Harnik / AP

California Sen. Kamala Harris urged Democrats in Ohio on Sunday to channel their emotions about the confirmation process involving Brett Kavanaugh into ousting elected Republicans this fall.

U.S. Senator Kamala Harris of California will speak the Ohio Democratic Party annual dinner in October.
Kamala Harris

Last month, President Donald Trump headlined the Ohio Republican Party’s annual state dinner. Now the Ohio Democratic Party has also chosen a high-profile speaker for its annual event.