journalism

If you told Brian Dzenis three years ago he would be loading postal semis for work, he would have laughed in your face. A former sports reporter at the now-defunct Youngstown Vindicator, affectionately known as the Vindy, Dzenis, 31, has spent the time after his layoff as a second-shift loader for FedEx, and an expediter for the United States Postal Service.

Updated at 2 p.m. ET

Dozens of foreign nationals working as journalists in the U.S. for Voice of America, the federal government's international broadcaster, will not have their visas extended once they expire, according to three people with knowledge of the decision.

Those people — each with current or past ties to the agency — said the new CEO of the U.S. Agency for Global Media, Michael Pack, signaled he will not approve the visa extensions.

Media Coverage Of Protests

Jun 8, 2020
Protesters closing down the intersection of Livingston and Lockbourne Avenues.
Nick Evans / WOSU

This episode originally aired on June 4, 2020.

Journalists face increased scrutiny of how they cover the demonstrations that have bloomed across the country in protest of the police killing of a black man in Minneapolis last week.

In some cases, they have become part of the story, having been pepper-sprayed, tear-gassed, struck by bottles and bricks and even arrested while they cover the demonstrations.

Media Coverage Of Protests

Jun 4, 2020
Protesters closing down the intersection of Livingston and Lockbourne Avenues.
Nick Evans / WOSU

Journalists face increased scrutiny of how they cover the demonstrations that have bloomed across the country in protest of the police killing of a black man in Minneapolis last week.

In some cases, they have become part of the story, having been pepper-sprayed, tear-gassed, struck by bottles and bricks and even arrested while they cover the demonstrations.

On occasion, how they cover the story, the words and syntax of the telling, have attracted criticism.

Updated 2:25 p.m. ET

Protesters staged large-scale demonstrations across the country on Sunday, expressing outrage at the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis and, more broadly, anger at police brutality. Some cities, including Minneapolis, Atlanta and Louisville, saw clashes with police, buildings and cars set afire, and looting.

The company managing cleveland.com has announced furloughs, pay cuts and additional changes for employees in an effort to save money during the pandemic, according to Advance Local.

Workers making more than $35,000 annually will receive pay cuts ranging from 2 percent to 20 percent depending on income level, CEO Caroline Harrison wrote in a memo to employees. The reductions will be in effect through December, Harrison said, though there will be a re-evaluation of the situation in September.

Updated: 5:37 p.m., Tuesday, April 7, 2020

Most of the remaining staff at The Plain Dealer will no longer cover news in Cleveland or Cuyahoga and Summit counties, instead shifting to become a "bureau" covering outlying areas.

The announcement comes just days after 22 staff were laid off.

The 14 remaining reporters will cover five Northeast Ohio counties: Geauga, Lake, Lorain, Medina and Portage, according to a statement from the Northeast Ohio Newspaper Guild Local 1.

Updated: 10:56 a.m., Tuesday, March 10, 2020.

The Plain Dealer will lay off 22 staffers later this month, including 18 members of the Cleveland newspaper’s union, Local 1 of the Northeast Ohio Newspaper Guild.

The layoffs are “strictly financial,” Editor-in-Chief Tim Warsinskey said in a statement published on cleveland.com, news website that is also owned by the paper’s sister company, Advance Local.

Ann B. Walker and Julialynne Walker
storycorps / WOSU

Ann B. Walker worked as a radio host, journalist, editor and columnist in Columbus for decades. She is a woman of many firsts: the first woman in broadcast management at WLWC-TV in Columbus, the very first female broadcaster to report on the Ohio legislature, and the first black woman from Franklin County given a White House appointment.

Ann spoke to her daughter Julialynne about the interview she believes led to her position as Media Director for the Community Services Agency under President Jimmy Carter.

Updated at 10:12 a.m. ET

The long slide in the U.S. newspaper industry took another dramatic turn Thursday.

Updated at 8:30 p.m. ET

NPR is asking the State Department to explain its decision to deny an NPR reporter press credentials to travel with Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on an upcoming trip to Europe, NPR President and CEO John Lansing announced Tuesday.

"We have sought clarification from the State Department regarding Michele Kelemen being dropped" from the trip, Lansing wrote in an email to employees. He added, "We have also asked what it means for future trips."

Jim Lehrer, the veteran journalist and writer known for his steady, low-key presence in the often noisy world of TV news, died Thursday. He co-founded PBS' NewsHour and won numerous honors — including Peabody and Emmy awards and a National Humanities Medal — in a career that spanned some 50 years.

News organizations and journalists' advocates are challenging restrictive new ground rules for reporters assigned to cover the Senate impeachment trial.

Correspondents who submit to an official credentialing process are granted broad access throughout the Capitol complex and usually encounter few restrictions in talking with members of Congress or others.

But now Senate Sergeant-at-Arms Michael Stenger has imposed new requirements for the impeachment trial, negotiated in part with Republican leadership:

The Future Of Journalism

Jan 8, 2020

GateHouse Media bought The Columbus Dispatch in 2015 and then merged with Gannett late last year. Since then, the newspaper has shrunk along with the workforce that produces it.

By March, another 188 Dispatch workers will be out of a job when the paper starts printing in indianapolis.

The Ohio Capital Journal on December 4, launched its online-only news outlet dedicated to Ohio state government.

Both developments are part of the changing face of journalism in the United States.

The Dayton Daily News media center in Dayton, Ohio.
Scott Beale / Flickr

Big changes are coming to Ohio’s longtime newspapers.

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