Jon Husted

Ohio Republican Governor candidate Mike DeWine speaks while running mate Jon Husted looks on.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Republican candidate for governor Mike DeWine and his running mate Jon Husted announced a new wellness initiative at a campaign event on Tuesday in Cleveland. The proposed plan would first roll out for all state employees, then eventually for people on Medicaid.

Mike DeWine and Richard Cordray
Associated Press

Ohio’s governor race has put a spotlight on Medicaid expansion, which provides health insurance for some 700,000 Ohioans. Now the debate as turned to who’s actually in that population.

Group of Libertarians arrive at the Ohio Secretary of State’s office to deliver petitions to put Charlie Earl on the ballot as a presidential nominee. Earl would then be swapped out for Gary Johnson.
Jo Ingles / Ohio Public Radio

The Libertarian Party of Ohio has officially regained “minor party” status in the state.

Jay LaPrete / Associated Press

Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted is taking extra steps to clarify the state's process for clearing voter rolls, outlining some new initiatives aimed at helping voters stay up-to-date.

Jay LaPrete / Associated Press

Democrats are saying thousands of voters could be affected by the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision upholding the way Ohio deletes inactive registrations. But Secretary of State Jon Husted, who’s also the Republican candidate for lieutenant governor, says the law prevents voters from being removed before the fall election.

John Minchillo / Associated Press

The Secretary of State says no voters will be removed from the rolls before the November election, in spite of the U.S. Supreme Court ruling upholding Ohio’s process of deleting inactive voters’ registrations.

Updated 6:34 p.m. ET

An ideologically split U.S. Supreme Court Monday upheld Ohio's controversial "use-it-or-lose-it" voting law by a 5-to-4 margin. The law allows the state to strike voters from the registration rolls if they fail to return a mailed address confirmation form, and don't vote for another four years, or two federal election cycles.

Failure to vote

Jay LaPrete / Associated Press

In a 5-4 decision, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Monday that Ohio can clean up its voting rolls by clearing people who haven't voted in a while.

Jay LaPrete / Associated Press

Do you have to vote even if you don't want to? Not doing so could put you on the path to losing your vote in some states.

On Monday at 10 a.m., the Supreme Court might release opinions in a number of significant cases on this year's docket, deciding the fate of President Trump's travel ban, public sector unions and political redistricting — among other possibilities.

Any day now, the U.S. Supreme Court may decide a case that could change how Ohio removes people from voter rolls. The court heard arguments in Husted v. A. Philip Randolph Institute in January. 

Federal law lays out a process for taking people’s names off the registered voter list if they have moved to a new address and haven’t updated election officials.

Secretary of State Jon Husted casts an early in-person absentee ballot at the Franklin County Board of Elections early voting center.
Dan Konik / Ohio Public Radio

Ohio voters are a week into early voting for the May primary. They're deciding hundreds of local issues, a major statewide issue on how Congressional maps are drawn and the party candidates for five major statewide offices.

Sen. Vernon Sykes (D-Akron, right) laughs with Secretary of State Jon Husted after the Ballot Board vote. Sykes was part of the group that negotiated the deal between lawmakers and citizen groups.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

A plan to change the way the state’s map of Congressional districts will be drawn after the 2020 census will be on the May ballot as Issue 1.

Evan Vucci / Associated Press

President Donald Trump came to the Cincinnati suburb of Blue Ash on Monday to tout the Republican tax reform bill he signed into law and boast that it is already paying dividends for American workers and companies.

Jo Ingles / Statehouse News Bureau

On Wednesday evening, Republican lawmakers are continuing to negotiate behind closed doors over a bill to reform how the state draws its Congressional maps. They’re looking to compromise with opponents of the plan, but negotiations this week have gotten rocky.

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