Jon Husted

Gov. Mike DeWine signs an executive order.
Office of Gov. Mike DeWine

Ohio's stay-at-home order is now less a command than a suggestion.

Gov. Mike DeWine inside the Governor's Residence in Columbus on Dec. 13, 2019.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

As the state reopens, Gov. Mike DeWine insists, the success of the economy depends on whether Ohioans follow social distancing protocols.

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine and Lt. Gov. Jon Husted on Thursday announced a slew of openings for various industries that have been closed for nearly two months during the coronavirus pandemic.

Rawpixel / Pexels

As Ohio begins reopening businesses, parents in need of child care will have to wait a while longer to find answers. Gov. Mike DeWine said he's not ready yet to announce a reopening date for daycares, something that was expected Monday, saying the plan needs more work.

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine speaks at his daily coronavirus press conference on April 8, 2020.
Office of Gov. Mike DeWine

Gov. Mike DeWine is making $775 million in budget cuts over the next two months, as the coronavirus pandemic takes a "profound" impact on the state's economy.

Protesters gather at the Ohio Statehouse to criticize the DeWine administration's coronavirus response on April 18, 2020.
David Holm / WOSU

Gov. Mike DeWine began his usual press conference Monday with a moment of silence to remember the four Kent State students who lost their lives 50 years ago.

Updated: 4:19 p.m., Wednesday, April 29, 2020

Ohio officials said on Wednesday that they reversed course on a requirement for all customers to wear masks before entering stores when they begin to reopen in May based on feedback from businesses.

According to Lt. Gov. Jon Husted, employers had many questions about how to enforce the new rule.

A statue of Arnold Schwarzenegger wears a face mask in downtown Columbus.
David Holm / WOSU

Wearing masks or facial coverings won't be mandatory for customers when retail businesses reopen in May, Gov. Mike DeWine announced, marking a quick reversal from the state's previous guidelines.

Updated: 4:10 p.m., Friday, April 24, 2020

Ohio will “substantially” increase its capacity for coronavirus testing as the state’s manufacturers step up the production of test kit components, Gov. Mike DeWine said Friday.

More testing, combined with expanded efforts to trace the spread of COVID-19 throughout the state, will help health workers “isolate” and “kill” the virus, the governor said.

“Frankly, what I like about this, and why I’m so excited is it’s going to enable us to really go on the offensive as we attack the virus,” DeWine said.

In this Thursday, March 26, 2020, photo, this wi-fi-enabled school bus, seen at an apartment complex in Winnsboro, S.C., is one of many being sent to rural and lower-income areas around South Carolina to help students with distance learning.
Meg Kinnard / Associated Press

With Ohio’s schools closed and lessons moved online for the rest of the academic year, most kids are spending more time on the computer. Millions of Ohioans are working from home.

Now-Lt. Gov. Jon Husted speaking at the Columbus Chamber of Commerce Government Day in Cincinnati, Ohio on Tuesday, Oct. 16, 2018.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

The financial impact of Ohio’s shutdowns for coronavirus is enormous, and the billions of dollars that have been set aside by the state over the last seven years may not be enough to cover it all.

Urgent care at Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, on March 31, 2020.
David Holm / WOSU

Thousands of Ohioans whose elective procedures were postponed as a result of the state’s coronavirus outbreak will soon be able to access the treatment they need. Gov. Mike DeWine said the state is easing its restrictions on medical centers, and first priority will be given to patients awaiting surgeries.

A Hilliard schools student completes classroom work with an iPad.
Columbus Neighborhoods / WOSU

Nearly a million Ohioans lack access to high-speed Internet. So doing schoolwork or regular work online is not an option unless users go in search of WiFi hotspots.

The pandemic has magnified a problem the state has struggled to solve.

Call logs from Jessica Zalants, who's been trying to reach Ohio's unemployment hotline.
Courtesy of Jessica Zalants / Ohio Center for Investigative Journalism

Marcia Gassaway was in the first wave of Ohioans put out of work by COVID-19.

The single mom from Cleveland went to the emergency room on March 15. Due to her coronavirus-like symptoms, doctors ordered that she be quarantined at a special facility.

More coronavirus testing and more protective masks will soon be available statewide as Ohio officials work to continue flattening Ohio’s COVID-19 curve. 

At his daily briefing Wednesday, Gov. Mike DeWine also announced further steps towards easing the essential businesses order.

Dozens of confirmed COVID-19 deaths have been recorded across the state in just the last few days, with confirmed cases now reported in 87 of Ohio’s 88 counties.

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