Jon Husted

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine, left, and his wife Fran, walk into the governor's residence after he tested positive for COVID-19 earlier in the day Thursday, Aug. 6, 2020, in Bexley, Ohio.
Jay LaPrete / Associated Press

Gov. Mike DeWine announced Thursday evening that he tested negative for COVID-19, after a rapid test earlier in the day gave a positive result. 

The anniversary of the mass shooting in Dayton is reviving conversations about gun regulations in Ohio. While lawmakers have refused to move Gov. Mike DeWine's (R-Ohio) gun regulation proposals, his administration is rolling out a program that he says can improve the accuracy of background checks.

House Speaker Larry Householder
Andy Chow / Ohio Public Radio

Ohio lawmakers are introducing bills that require more transparency when it comes to dark money groups in political campaigns. The bills are in reaction to an alleged racketeering scheme involving a dark money organization and Ohio House Speaker Larry Householder (R-Glenford).

A caregiver tests a patient for coronavirus at University Hospitals, Monday, March 16, 2020, in Mayfield Heights, Ohio.
Tony Dejak / Associated Press

Ohio is pumping millions of dollars into the production of more personal protective equipment to help people prevent the spread of the coronavirus. Lt. Gov. Jon Husted says the plan will also help Ohio's economic recovery.

Gov. Mike DeWine and First Lady Fran DeWine wearing face masks on June 23, 2020.
Office of Gov. Mike DeWine

Gov. Mike DeWine announced the Ohio Department of Health will issue a public health order requiring face masks in public in seven counties where the spread of COVID-19 is considered most severe.

President Donald tours the Whirlpool Corporation in Clyde, Ohio, Thursday, Aug. 6, 2020.
Susan Walsh / Associated Press

WOSU is providing updates about the coronavirus and COVID-19 in Ohio. Find the most recent news and information below.

Gov. Mike DeWine signs an executive order.
Office of Gov. Mike DeWine

Ohio's stay-at-home order is now less a command than a suggestion.

Gov. Mike DeWine inside the Governor's Residence in Columbus on Dec. 13, 2019.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

As the state reopens, Gov. Mike DeWine insists, the success of the economy depends on whether Ohioans follow social distancing protocols.

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine and Lt. Gov. Jon Husted on Thursday announced a slew of openings for various industries that have been closed for nearly two months during the coronavirus pandemic.

Rawpixel / Pexels

As Ohio begins reopening businesses, parents in need of child care will have to wait a while longer to find answers. Gov. Mike DeWine said he's not ready yet to announce a reopening date for daycares, something that was expected Monday, saying the plan needs more work.

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine speaks at his daily coronavirus press conference on April 8, 2020.
Office of Gov. Mike DeWine

Gov. Mike DeWine is making $775 million in budget cuts over the next two months, as the coronavirus pandemic takes a "profound" impact on the state's economy.

Protesters gather at the Ohio Statehouse to criticize the DeWine administration's coronavirus response on April 18, 2020.
David Holm / WOSU

Gov. Mike DeWine began his usual press conference Monday with a moment of silence to remember the four Kent State students who lost their lives 50 years ago.

Updated: 4:19 p.m., Wednesday, April 29, 2020

Ohio officials said on Wednesday that they reversed course on a requirement for all customers to wear masks before entering stores when they begin to reopen in May based on feedback from businesses.

According to Lt. Gov. Jon Husted, employers had many questions about how to enforce the new rule.

A statue of Arnold Schwarzenegger wears a face mask in downtown Columbus.
David Holm / WOSU

Wearing masks or facial coverings won't be mandatory for customers when retail businesses reopen in May, Gov. Mike DeWine announced, marking a quick reversal from the state's previous guidelines.

Updated: 4:10 p.m., Friday, April 24, 2020

Ohio will “substantially” increase its capacity for coronavirus testing as the state’s manufacturers step up the production of test kit components, Gov. Mike DeWine said Friday.

More testing, combined with expanded efforts to trace the spread of COVID-19 throughout the state, will help health workers “isolate” and “kill” the virus, the governor said.

“Frankly, what I like about this, and why I’m so excited is it’s going to enable us to really go on the offensive as we attack the virus,” DeWine said.

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