John Patterson | WOSU Radio

John Patterson

Ohio lawmakers will soon consider a school funding formula overhaul, which has undergone some changes since it was first introduced in March.

State Reps. Bob Cupp, left, and John Patterson discuss the latest version of their proposal to overhaul to school funding in Ohio system at the Statehouse in Columbus, Ohio, Wednesday, June 26, 2019.
Kantele Franko / AP

Lawmakers introducing a proposal Wednesday to overhaul Ohio's school funding system said they changed their original plan to direct more money for economically disadvantaged students and phase in changes over six years, rather than four.

Ohio State Reps. Bob Cupp, R-Lima, left, and John Patterson, D-Jefferson, announce their proposed overhaul of Ohio's school funding formula at the Statehouse in Columbus, Monday, March 25, 2019.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

State lawmakers who studied potential ways to overhaul Ohio's school funding system have made changes to their initial plan and are set to introduce the resulting proposal at the Statehouse.

Ohio’s eight urban school districts are calling for changes to the newly-proposed school funding formula saying more factors need to be taken into account.

Ohio State Reps. Bob Cupp, R-Lima, left, and John Patterson, D-Jefferson, announce their proposed overhaul of Ohio's school funding formula at the Statehouse in Columbus, Monday, March 25, 2019.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Ohio lawmakers considering public input on proposed changes to school funding are hearing from interested parties who say it's a solid start, but want more: more money for certain schools, more clarity on charter-school funding changes and more help for the economically disadvantaged.

Ohio State Reps. Bob Cupp, R-Lima, left, and John Patterson, D-Jefferson, announce their proposed overhaul of Ohio's school funding formula at the Statehouse in Columbus, Monday, March 25, 2019.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

State Reps. Bob Cupp (R-Lima) and John Patterson (D-Jefferson) are traveling around the state to present their new school funding formula proposal to different teachers and school administrators around Ohio.

Ohio State Reps. Bob Cupp, R-Lima, left, and John Patterson, D-Jefferson, announce their proposed overhaul of Ohio's school funding formula at the Statehouse in Columbus, Monday, March 25, 2019.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Ohio would spend about $400 million more on school funding next fiscal year and $320 million more the following year under a proposed overhaul of the funding system, according to estimates shared Friday by lawmakers advocating for the plan.

Bill Phillis, who was behind the first lawsuit over school funding in Ohio in 1991 is encouraged by a new funding proposal.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

The man who filed the 1991 lawsuit that led to Ohio’s school funding system being ruled unconstitutional four times says a new funding formula from two state lawmakers is on the right track. His optimism, though, comes with a caveat.

Rep. Bob Cupp (R-Lima) watches as Rep. John Patterson (D-Ashtabula) talks about their new school funding formula.
Karen Kasler / Statehouse News Bureau

The Ohio Supreme Court has struck down Ohio’s property-tax based school funding method four times in the last 22 years. Now two lawmakers say they think they’ve finally fixed it with a new school funding formula they say is stable, customizable and transparent.

Ohio State Reps. Bob Cupp, R-Lima, left, and John Patterson, D-Jefferson, announce their proposed overhaul of Ohio's school funding formula at the Statehouse in Columbus, Monday, March 25, 2019.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

State lawmakers proposing an overhaul of how Ohio funds schools said Monday that it would more fairly split local and state shares and factor in the cost of educating a child and a community's ability to help pay for it.

Rusty Clark / Flickr

A year ago this week, an 18-year-old Columbus man was killed on a thrill ride on the first day of the Ohio State Fair. Legislation has been proposed to strengthen ride safety, but the law named for Tyler Jarrell hasn’t passed yet.

James St. John / Flickr

Speaker Pro Tem Kirk Schuring, who's filling in as the Ohio House's top leader, has once again called off the vote for a new Speaker. That disorder of not having a speaker in charge is making its way into policymaking and could make for some long delays.