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Pedraam Faridjoo of Kensington, Md., is spending his summer volunteering and traveling. Ryan Abshire from Carmel, Ind., is using the time to be with his family. Meme Etheridge of St. Simons Island, Ga., is attending a music camp where she plays percussion.

What do they all have in common? They're teenagers, and they are not working summer jobs.

A summer job, like lifeguarding or scooping ice cream, used to be a rite of passage for teens. Thirty years ago, nearly two-thirds of U.S. teenagers worked summer jobs. Twenty years ago, more than half of them did.

Pexels

Ohio’s unemployment rate went up in June to 4.5 percent. That’s compared with 4.3 percent in May, which was the lowest level since July 2001. But the number of employed Ohioans last month increased a bit, too.

Skilled Trade Jobs

Jul 16, 2018
construction worker
U.S. Air Force

The number of construction and extraction jobs are expected to grow 11 percent between 2016 and 2026, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. However, a wave of baby boomers working skilled trade jobs such as these are retiring, and there are not enough young workers being trained to replace them.

Updated 8:45 a.m. ET

The Labor Department on Friday reported another big month for job growth, with a larger than expected addition of 213,000 jobs for June.

The unemployment rate ticked up slightly to 4 percent as some people who had been on the sidelines moved back into the labor force.

The report underscores a familiar refrain: There are lots of jobs being created, but not enough people to fill them. That continues as employers consistently hire at robust rates and the unemployment rate keeps falling.

Skilled Trade Jobs

Jun 21, 2018
construction worker
U.S. Air Force

The number of construction and extraction jobs are expected to grow 11 percent between 2016 and 2026, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. However, a wave of baby boomers working skilled trade jobs such as these are retiring, and there are not enough young workers being trained to replace them.

Allegra Boverman

Ohio gained 20,000 new private sector jobs in May, meaning the state is outpacing the nation in job growth rate this year. That’s despite having no measureable job growth in all 2017.

Bernard Spragg / Flickr

A new report from the National Low Income Housing Coalition and the Coalition on Homelessness and Housing in Ohio (COHHIO) found that only two of the top 10 most common jobs in Ohio pay enough to rent a basic two-bedroom apartment.

Updated at 4:41 p.m. ET

For years, various reports have indicated that the contract workforce is growing rapidly in the U.S.

On Thursday, the Labor Department poured a bucket of cold water on that notion. It released a report showing contract workers make up a slightly smaller share of the workforce than the last time the survey was done 13 years ago.

dave_7 / Flickr

UPS announced on Wednesday that the company would immediately begin the hiring 600 permanent jobs in Columbus.

File photo

Ohio’s unemployment rate dropped again in April, this time to a level not seen in 17 years.

Flickr.com

For the last two decades, the demand for pharmacists outpaced their supply - until now. Supply has finally caught up to demand, especially in Ohio.

Pharmacy graduates can still easily get a job in their field, but now their roles are changing.

You often hear jobs described as high-skill or low-skill. But the jobs that Ohio employers have the most trouble filling fall somewhere in between.

Legal Marijuana Oregon
Gosia Wozniacka / Associated Press

Glen Miller sits in the second row of his Horticulture 101 class, listening as his professor gives a lecture on plant biology. At 61, Miller took a buyout from his former employer—a telecommunications company—and decided instead of retiring, he’d enroll in a training program for a second career. A career in cannabis.

Pixabay

As college students stress about landing their first job, the question of how their grade point average will impact their chances looms large. It may seem like the equation should be simple: the better the grade point average, the bigger the edge.

Ohio Gov. John Kasich
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

Gov. John Kasich is sounding off about a report over the weekend saying that his job creation record for the last two years is only slightly better than that of his Democratic predecessor, Ted Strickland.

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