Jobs

construction workers
Pixabay

Construction was among the industries that saw the most job growth in Ohio last year, according to state employment data published Wednesday by the U.S. Labor Department.

Tim Rudell / WKSU

Union Metal in Canton gave 300-plus workers the word last month that the plant is closing for good this month, and they’re all out of work. Ohio is offering a special set of information sessions to help the employees find something new.

While the tax reform law will provide tax cuts to Ohioans, those cuts may not provide the boost needed for future economic growth. Ohio State University economist Mark Partridge says Ohio's manufacturers may see some benefit, but investment in workers will do more.

File photo

Ohio’s official unemployment rate took a sharp downturn turn last month, although a separate survey of employers showed fewer people in the workforce.

New data from the Census Bureau's Annual Survey of Manufactures rank Ohio in the top three states for manufacturing employment, behind California and Texas.

The number of Ohioans working in manufacturing has risen each year since the Great Recession ended. Employment peaked in 2015 at about 650,000. Last year it dropped by 10,000. But the state still leads manufacturing employment in the Midwest. Nationally, Ohio ranked 17th in terms of employment growth since 2010. Employment grew 10 percent during that time.

ant2506 / Pixabay

Automation is overtaking once reliable jobs in a number of industries, and these trends are changing the ways parents and educators prepare children to develop career interests and enter the workforce. Email tracking allows providers to collect a variety of information on your web activity.

Then, Russell Holly gives his picks for some of the best holiday tech gifts for teens in 2017.

Workers build Honda Accords at the Honda factory in Marysville, Ohio
Steve Brown / WOSU

October was a good month for the state's job market.

Job ad in newspaper classified
FLICKR

Ohio's official unemployment rate increased slightly last month, though another survey of employers shows the state added just over 5,000 jobs. 

Jonathan Guffey has chiseled youthful looks and, at 32, does not have the haggard bearing of someone who has spent more than half his life hooked on opioids. That stint with the drug started at 15 and ended — he says for good — 22 months ago. He has a job working with his family in construction, but his work history is pockmarked by addiction.

"I've worked in a couple of factories for a short amount of time, probably just long enough to get the first check to get high off of," Guffey says.

Driving down the main commercial artery in Muncie, Ind., it seems the job market is doing well. The local unemployment rate stands at 3.8 percent, and there are hiring signs posted outside the McDonald's, a pizza joint and at stop lights.

Around 2007 — the last time the market was so tight — job applicants came streaming through the offices of Express Employment Professionals, a staffing agency that screens and places about 120 workers a month, mostly at the local manufacturing firms.

Updated at 11:30 a.m. ET

President Trump says he has a fix to the deep racial divide in America, blatantly exposed in the clashes between white supremacists and counterprotesters in Charlottesville, Va.

"I think if we continue to create jobs at levels that I'm creating jobs, I think that's going to have a tremendously positive impact on race relations. I do. I do," he said in Phoenix on Aug. 22, adding that he thinks bigger paychecks will also help improve race relations.

Donald Trump speaking on campaign trail.
Gage Skidmore / Wikipedia

Policy Matters Ohio says President Trump has a long way to go before delivering on his promise to restore blue-collar jobs in the state.

Ohio State State Superintendent Paolo DeMaria
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

The Ohio Department of Education is partnering with the staffing company Adecco to match high school students with local businesses.

An estimated 222,000 jobs were added to the U.S. economy in June, according to the monthly employment report released by the Bureau of Labor Statistics Friday.

"The job gains were better than expected — most economists had predicted a gain of 180,000 jobs," NPR's Chris Arnold reports for our Newscast unit.

The unemployment rate rose slightly to 4.4 percent from 4.3 percent — a 16-year low that was hit in May.

Why can't kids today just work their way through college the way earlier generations did?

The answer to that question isn't psychology. It's math. A summer job just doesn't have the purchasing power it used to, especially when you compare it with the cost of college.

Let's take the example of a working-class student at a four-year public university who's getting no help from Mom and Dad. In 1981-'82, the average full cost to attend was $2,870. That's for tuition, fees and room and board.

Pages