Jobs

Dashawn Hodge found his first job through the Boys and Girls Club's Summer Work Program.
Leticia Wiggins / WOSU

Dashawn Hodge is just a normal 14-year-old boy who hates cutting the grass.

“My mom told me when I get home, I gotta cut the grass,” he says. “I looked at her like, ‘No, I can’t cut the grass!”

Members of United Auto Workers Local 1112 are more skeptical than optimistic after the announcement Wednesday that General Motors is in talks to sell its Lordstown plant to Cincinnati-based Workhorse Group, an upstart maker of electric trucks.

Many are shocked the company would rather sell the plant than assign a new GM vehicle to be built in Lordstown.

Jordan Washington switched careers to be an electrician, which he's learning on the job as part of a five-year apprenticeship.
Rivet / WOSU

Driving a semi-truck is a job that gives you plenty of time to think – too much, actually, for Jordan Washington. He says the job paid well, and it was fun in the beginning until the monotony sunk in.

“But then after a while, I’m just like, 'O.K., I’m bored. This is not for me,’” Washington says.

Ohio House

A new bill in the Ohio House would crack down on elected officials at all levels who fail to show up to do those jobs. 

Online retail giant Amazon is hosting employment information sessions across the Miami Valley this week. The first was held Monday morning in Wilmington, where Amazon officials say they’re looking to hire hundreds of new workers at the company's new facility at Wilmington Air Park.

The jobs sorting packages and moving cargo are expected to start at $15 an hour -- a prospect that had attracted more than two dozen job seekers by 8 a.m. 

Ohio's Unemployment Rate Drops To 4.4 Percent

Apr 19, 2019
Pexels

Ohio's seasonally adjusted unemployment rate fell from February to March.

During his campaign for governor, Mike DeWine said he supports JobsOhio as a non-profit job creating entity, but he wants it to be more transparent. Now he’s deciding how to make that happen.

A program launched last July to reduce aggressive panhandling in Downtown Cincinnati is still showing good results.  

Paige Pfleger / WOSU

Deepa Halaharvi is a morning person.

"Eat, read, pray, and get ready to go to work," she says, laughing. "And usually I’m out the door around 6:15 or 6:30."

Updated at 8:45 a.m. ET

The U.S. labor market bounced back strongly in March after a lackluster showing in February.

U.S. employers added 196,000 jobs last month, the Labor Department reported Friday. That's a big improvement from February, when revised figures show just 33,000 jobs were added. But it's a slowdown from the last three months of 2018, when monthly job growth averaged 233,000.

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine speaks during a public inauguration ceremony at the Ohio Statehouse, Monday, Jan. 14, 2019, in Columbus.
Ty Greenlees / AP/Dayton Daily News, Pool

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine says the state’s non-profit jobs development company needs to be more transparent with the public and needs to combine efforts with other state agencies.

Job seekers at one of two fulfillment centers in Central Ohio.
Esther Honig / WOSU

A new report from the Ohio Chamber of Commerce says businesses it surveyed in the Buckeye State plan to hire employees despite the uncertainty of economic stability.

Olivia Miltner / WOSU

A job training effort hosted by tech giant Google held its first Ohio workshop in Columbus at the main downtown library Monday.

Updated at 10:35 a.m. ET

The U.S. economy added only 20,000 jobs — far fewer than expected — last month, the Labor Department said Friday. But the unemployment rate fell to 3.8 percent from January's 4 percent, and earnings growth picked up.

The increase in jobs was below the 180,000 projected by private analysts and the smallest gain since September 2017. February's increase was dramatically smaller than January's revised gain of 311,000 and December's revised 227,000.

Signs hang from windows at the UAW Local 1112 union hall, Tuesday, Nov. 27, 2018, in Lordstown, Ohio.
Tony Dejak / Associated Press

Hundreds of workers at four General Motors plants slated to close by January are facing a painful choice: Take the company's offer to work at another factory — possibly hundreds of miles away — even if that means leaving behind their families, their homes and everything they've built. Or stay and risk losing their high-paying jobs.

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