jobs and family services | WOSU Radio

jobs and family services

A Montgomery County judge’s ruling Monday keeps hundreds of Montgomery County Children’s Services workers from returning to the picket line they began on Friday.

Judge Richard Skelton extended Friday’s temporary restraining order barring the Professional Guild of Ohio (PGO) union from continuing its strike. The county and the union must now return to the bargaining table.

Montgomery County Children’s Services workers walked out on strike for about two hours on Friday before a court ordered them back to work, effectively halting the strike for 72 hours.

Montgomery County Children’s Services workers will strike this week, unless a deal is reached before then. The dispute between the 270 member union and the county centers on wages.

Lt. Gov. Husted Addresses Adoption Summit

May 21, 2019
Lt. Gov.-elect Jon Husted speaks with Gov.-elect Mike DeWine looking on.
Andy Chow / Ohio Public Radio

Ohio's lieutenant governor stressed the importance of foster care initiatives at an adoption summit hosted by a national nonprofit foundation that helps find adoptive homes for foster children.

Julie Callahan shows a picture of her family, including her son Jackson, who is non-verbal autistic. She says relinquishing custody was the last option left.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

In Ohio, parents of children with severe mental health issues sometimes face an excruciating decision: To get their child costly care, they must sign over custody to the state. Now those parents are fighting for change, and a chunk of Gov. Mike Dewine’s budget.

The Ohio House version of the new two-year state budget has proposed doubling the $30 million Gov. Mike DeWine asked for to take care of foster children in Ohio. 

Mike DeWine
Jay LaPrete / AP

Children services officials are celebrating a proposal from Gov. Mike DeWine that nearly doubles the amount of state funding that goes towards their cause. They say this is the first indication in a long time that the state is taking issues like foster care seriously.

The federal government has been partially shut down for almost a week, but not all agencies and services in Ohio are equally affected.

Eligible households will still receive cash and food benefits for January, a spokeswoman for the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services said. The department administers both federal programs, known as Temporary Assistance for Needy Families and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. 

Gabe Rosenberg / WOSU

Even beyond the failed Issue 1, the impact of the opioid crisis was all over Ohio ballots on Tuesday – from candidates with proposed opioid solutions to county levies for strained children services departments.

Children color at Youth & Family Day at WOSU@COSI.
A.J Zanyk

Franklin County officials are raising concerns about looming requirements for child care providers. The mandate takes effect in 2020, but the county has a ways to go before local providers are in compliance.

Gabe Rosenberg / WOSU

Ohio has launched a program to help young adults who have aged out of the foster care system make the transition to living independently.

Gabe Rosenberg / WOSU

Among the many ballot measures and tax levies approved around Ohio, one in Vinton County could provide some relief from the opioid crisis.

File photo

Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine announced a program to help families hurt by parents' addiction to painkillers and heroin.

Gabe Rosenberg

Jennifer Mills drives down a long open road, flanked by fields of yellow grass, clouds overhanging.

As a child services caseworker, Mills says on most days she will drive from one end of Ross County to the other, filing paperwork at the local courthouse and to check in on her clients. Most are parents struggling to keep their kids, and kids adjusting to living without their parents. 

In the last seven years, the number of children taken into custody by children services agencies in Ohio soared by nearly 20%, and half of those cases involve parental drug use. And the agencies charged with caring for those kids say Gov. John Kasich’s proposed budget doesn’t do enough to help them

Unemployment Insurance Claims Office sign
Flickr / Creative Commons

The number of workers unemployed in Ohio rose slightly in September.  The Ohio Department of Job and Family Services reports the unemployment was 4.8 percent in September, up from 4.7 percent in August.