Jobs | WOSU Radio

Jobs

Updated at 9:31 a.m. ET

The economy is slowing down, but it keeps creating jobs at a healthy pace. Employers added 164,000 jobs last month, as the unemployment rate held steady at 3.7%, the Labor Department said Friday. The jobless rate remains at a nearly 50-year low.

Analysts had expected about 165,000 jobs to be added in July and the unemployment rate to be 3.6%.

Amazon Building Two More Distribution Centers In Ohio

Jul 22, 2019
Amazon distribution center in Groveport, Ohio.
WOSU

Amazon says it will open two new distribution centers in Ohio.

The company announced Monday that the two sites in Akron and near Toledo will bring a combined 2,500 full-time jobs.

construction workers
Pixabay

Ohio’s unemployment rate was down slightly in June. It was an even 4% last month compared to 4.1% in May. Companies in Ohio have jobs that are going unfilled right now.

Amazon employees who are filling boxes in warehouses may be the industry's next engineers.

The company announced Thursday that it will spend more than $700 million to train 100,000 employees for higher-skilled jobs over the next six years.

Updated at 9:25 a.m. ET

Hiring rebounded strongly in June as U.S. employers added 224,000 jobs. That's well above the pace many forecasters were expecting, and a sharp pickup after a disappointing May.

A monthly snapshot from the Labor Department showed unemployment rose slightly, to 3.7%, as more workers entered the job market.

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U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, speaks at a Culinary Union hall Saturday, Feb. 23, 2019, in Las Vegas.
John Locher / Associated Press

Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio) is proposing a bill that would require overtime pay for any salaried worker making less than $51,064, a more than $15,000 increase to the Trump Administration's proposed threshold.

WOSU

A coalition of groups that advocates for low-income Ohioans says the state has made considerable progress in the effort to reduce poverty, but there is much more work to be done.

Updated at 4:46 p.m. ET

Hiring slowed sharply last month, as U.S. employers added just 75,000 jobs. The unemployment rate held steady at 3.6%.

The monthly snapshot from the Labor Department suggests businesses are increasingly cautious in the face of the Trump administration's ongoing trade wars.

Danavan McIntosh programs the 3-D printer in a tech lab at Goodwill Columbus.
Leticia Wiggins / WOSU

During an early shift at FedEx, Danavan McIntosh made his way down a tall ladder. He'd done it a million times before. This time, he felt himself falling.

Brittany Smith grew up mostly in Detroit, earning a master's degree in public health from the University of Michigan. But when she and her then-boyfriend, Sam, began their careers, they ran into roadblocks. It was 2013, and Detroit was still struggling from the effects of the Great Recession. Sam Smith couldn't find full-time work. His job as a college career counselor wrapped when the campus where he worked shut down.

They began looking for an out.

Gaby Gemetti thought she was failing. After having a second child, she struggled to be a good mom and also a good employee.

"I felt like I wasn't a good mother," she says. "I was waking up in the middle of the night thinking about, 'Oh, my presentation,' or just work in general."

So, even though Gemetti was moving up the management ranks at a top tech company in Silicon Valley, she gave up the job four years ago to stay home in Santa Clara, Calif. As hard as it was, Gemetti's decision was particularly driven by her son's needs, when he started requiring regular therapy.

Dashawn Hodge found his first job through the Boys and Girls Club's Summer Work Program.
Leticia Wiggins / WOSU

Dashawn Hodge is just a normal 14-year-old boy who hates cutting the grass.

“My mom told me when I get home, I gotta cut the grass,” he says. “I looked at her like, ‘No, I can’t cut the grass!”

Members of United Auto Workers Local 1112 are more skeptical than optimistic after the announcement Wednesday that General Motors is in talks to sell its Lordstown plant to Cincinnati-based Workhorse Group, an upstart maker of electric trucks.

Many are shocked the company would rather sell the plant than assign a new GM vehicle to be built in Lordstown.

Jordan Washington switched careers to be an electrician, which he's learning on the job as part of a five-year apprenticeship.
Rivet / WOSU

Driving a semi-truck is a job that gives you plenty of time to think – too much, actually, for Jordan Washington. He says the job paid well, and it was fun in the beginning until the monotony sunk in.

“But then after a while, I’m just like, 'O.K., I’m bored. This is not for me,’” Washington says.

Ohio House

A new bill in the Ohio House would crack down on elected officials at all levels who fail to show up to do those jobs. 

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