Jim Renacci | WOSU Radio

Jim Renacci

Phil Long / Associated Press

Candidates in Ohio's U.S. Senate campaign on Saturday argued in a second debate over different positions on taxes, immigration, gun control, climate change, the influence of money on politics and health care.

Watch Live: Brown, Renacci Hold Second U.S. Senate Debate

Oct 20, 2018
Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, left, and Rep. Jim Renacci, R-Ohio, participate in a debate at the Idea Center in Playhouse Square, Sunday, Oct. 14, 2018, in Cleveland.
Phil Long / AP Pool Photo

The second of three planned debates in Ohio's U.S. Senate campaign is set for Saturday night.

Two-term Democratic Sen. Sherrod Brown and Republican U.S. Rep. Jim Renacci will debate in WOSU-TV's studio.

Democrat Sen. Sherrod Brown,  (left) and Republican Rep. Jim Renacci speaks during a debate at the Idea Center in Playhouse Square, Sunday in Cleveland.
Phil Long / AP Pool Photo

In this week's Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU Public Media, Mike Thompson and Steve Brown look at a new poll showing an evenly-divided state going into next month’s election, and the U.S. Senate debate that got deeply personal.

Phil Long / Associated Press

Republican U.S. Rep. Jim Renacci traveled repeatedly aboard a Cleveland strip-club owner's private plane during his run for Ohio governor without properly reporting the costs of those flights, according to an Associated Press review.

The battle for the Senate is being fought on Republican-friendly turf, and with three weeks until Election Day the GOP is increasingly optimistic that the chamber will remain in the party's grasp.

Fears that a fiery Democratic opposition could turn the map upside down have abated some, now that the GOP base is more tuned in following the confirmation fight over Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh.

Democrat Sen. Sherrod Brown,  (left) and Republican Rep. Jim Renacci speaks during a debate at the Idea Center in Playhouse Square, Sunday in Cleveland.
Phil Long / AP Pool Photo

Candidates in Ohio's U.S. senate campaign sparred Sunday over health care, approaches to climate change, student loan debt, immigration, tariffs and gun control in the first of three debates in Cleveland.

President Donald Trump came to Lebanon Friday night to tell an enthusiastic crowd in a Warren County Fairgrounds building that the confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court was more than just a victory for himself and Senate Republicans.

President Donald Trump returns to Southwest Ohio Friday for an evening rally in Warren County.

The event at the Warren County Fairgrounds is expected to draw large crowds.

The Warren County Sheriff's Office is urging rally-goers to anticipate traffic delays and plan accordingly.

Doors Friday will open at 4 p.m., three hours ahead of the rally’s scheduled 7 p.m. start.

Associated Press

Early voting is now underway in Ohio, which has seen strong Republican wins in the last two midterm election cycles. But many are wondering about the impact of an increase in registered voters in a midterm year that looks good nationwide for Democrats.

So who, besides Brett Kavanaugh and Donald Trump, won this nasty, bitter, ugly mud-wrestling match that was Kavanaugh's narrow confirmation to the U.S. Supreme Court?

Former Ohio Congressman Jim Renacci
Mark Duncan / Associated Press

U.S. Rep. Jim Renacci, a Republican congressman vying for U.S. Senate in Ohio, has used a strip-club owner's private plane to fly to campaign events, campaign finance records show.

Updated at 7:30 p.m. ET

As the confirmation vote for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh neared, both parties had seen potential political benefits for them in the upcoming midterm elections.

For Republicans, it was a chance to energize the base by putting another conservative justice on the court, potentially reshaping it for a generation.

For Democrats, the specter of rolling back abortion rights, the Affordable Care Act and more was a way to further energize an already engaged liberal base to go to the polls.

If you were in charge of the Ohio Republican Party, would you want President Trump to come back to the Buckeye State again and again before the November election, as he did last Friday night at the Ohio Republican Party's annual dinner in Columbus?

President Donald Trump speaks during the 2018 Ohio Republican Party State Dinner, Friday, Aug. 24, 2018, in Columbus, Ohio.
John Minchillo / AP

President Donald Trump sought to unite Ohio's fractious state Republican Party on Friday, bitterly complaining about "negative, nasty" Democrats and warning that the Democratic contender for governor would "destroy your state."

President Donald Trump and U.S. Senate candidate Jim Rennaci.
Manuel Balce Ceneta / Associated Press

President Donald Trump will return to Ohio later this month to headline the Ohio Republican Party's state dinner.

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