Issue 1 | WOSU Radio

Issue 1

Frank LaRose

A federal court has ruled that Ohio's congressional map is an "unconstitutional partisan gerrymander" and must be redrawn before the 2020 election.

On Friday, March 22, 2019, a participant smokes a marijuana cigarette during at meet and greet at "Tommy Chong's Live, Love, and Smoke Tour" in Los Angeles.
Richard Vogel / Associated Press

Medical marijuana is still a new sight around Ohio, but the conversation is already shifting. Columbus City Council president Shannon Hardin wants to reduce penalties for marijuana possession, and he's taking the first step Thursday night at a public hearing in Council chambers.

Flyers for Issue 1, the successful 2018 ballot issue that created a new redistricting process.
Nick Castele / ideastream

The state of Ohio and voting rights groups face off Monday in a Cincinnati courtroom to determine the fate of the 2020 political map.

Gabe Rosenberg / WOSU

Not sure if you heard, but the midterm elections were a pretty big deal in 2018. How do we know this? Well, because election stories took up half of WOSU’s most-viewed articles of the year. While 2018 will always be The Year Of The Kangaroo Sign in our hearts, politics dominated the headlines at WOSU, from the 12th District special election to the U.S. Senate race to Issue 1.

Ohio History Connection

Earlier this month, Ohio voters rejected the latest attempt to change the state constitution through a referendum. Issue 1, a measure to lessen penalties for some drug crimes, lost by a wide margin.

Ohio House

Leaders of the Ohio Legislature say it’s time to look at restricting ways for citizens to change the state constitution.

Ohio Senate President Larry Obhof (R-Medina)
Ohio Senate

The Republican leader of the Ohio Senate says while he and many others didn’t support Issue 1, the criminal sentencing and drug treatment reform plan that failed Tuesday, it had useful elements that the newly elected Senate will make a top priority next year.

New Hampshire State Forensic Lab

For the third time in four years, Ohio voters soundly rejected a constitutional amendment that cost supporters millions to put on the ballot. Issue 1, the drug sentencing ballot proposal, was defeated by a 2-to-1 ratio.

Health care was a big campaign issue across the Midwest, and Tuesday's election results were mixed. Among the winners: medical marijuana.

WOSU

State Issue 1, Ohio's drug sentencing ballot amendment, has failed at the polls.

Statehouse News Bureau

Republican Dave Yost and Democrat Steve Dettelbach are both attorneys, and they both have a way with words, peppering their comments with colorful phrases like “that’s just horsefeathers” and “malarkey.” 

The podcast Serial has called new attention to the power that local judges wield over everything from license suspensions to prison sentences.

“Judges in America are really the only elected public officials that the public invests with the authority to take their property, their liberty and sometimes even their life,” retired Cleveland Municipal Judge Ronald Adrine said.

There are more than a dozen contested judicial races on Cuyahoga County ballots this November, from the state supreme court down to the court of common pleas.

Democratic candidate for Ohio Attorney General, Steve Dettlebach, left, and Republican candidate Dave Yost, right.
Andy Chow / Ohio Public Radio

The candidates for Ohio Attorney General, Steve Dettlebach and Dave Yost, talked criminal justice reform in their first debate. The discussion came after an audience member asked a question referencing the hit podcast "Serial" that's been shining a harsh light on Cleveland courts and police.

New Hampshire State Forensic Lab

Voters in Ohio will see one statewide issue on the ballot. Supporters have said this constitutional amendment will steer non-violent drug offenders away from prison and into treatment. But opponents claim it will dismantle the work Ohio has already done to curb the opioid epidemic. 

Pastor Greg Delaney, who previously supported Issue 1, works to help drug addicts.
Jo Ingles / Ohio Public Radio

A Southwest Ohio pastor who was speaking out in support of Issue 1, the state ballot issue that would provide drug users and possessors with treatment instead of jail time, is changing his mind.

Pages