internet

person working on laptop computer
Pexels

Nearly 1 million Ohio households lack reliable broadband service, including 300,000 who don’t have any service at all. The Ohio House has passed a bill that would help expand broadband, and it's now up to Senators to pass the plan.

Columbus City Schools District Office.
Nick Evans / WOSU

The Columbus Board of Education has approved a $35,000 deal with Verizon to help get local students internet access.

View of the Cuyahoga County Juvenile Justice Center, which also houses an antenna to support local internet coverage.
Eye On Ohio / Ohio Center For Investigative Juornalism

Computer trainer and former library aide Shenee King has a bird’s eye view when it comes to digital inequity.

Wikipedia is a well-known first stop on the internet when it comes to researching just about anything - except, perhaps, notable women. Not only are 84% to 92% of editors on the site male, but the vast majority of Wikipedia profiles are about men, with fewer than 20% of pages devoted to women.

A Russian law has taken effect that, in theory, would allow the Russian government to cut off the country's Internet from the rest of the world.

The "sovereign Internet law," as the government calls it, greatly enhances the Kremlin's control over the Web. It was passed earlier this year and allows Russia's government to cut off the Internet completely or from traffic outside Russia "in an emergency," as the BBC reported. But some of the applications could be more subtle, like the ability to block a single post.

After years of enduring slow, spotty internet service in their neighborhood — the subject of reports accusing providers of digital redlining — residents of Fairfax will have access to high-speed, wireless broadband connections in their homes beginning this fall.

Lt. Gov. Jon Husted at the Opportunity Zones Showcase in Columbus, where he unveiled the marketing platform for opportunity zones to share details on places and projects available for investment.
Karen Kasler / Statehouse News Bureau

Lt. Gov. Jon Husted said he’s tired of waiting for internet service providers to come forward with ideas on how to expand broadband and high speed internet in Ohio. So he’s offering up some state-owned options to those companies to get them on board.

Tech Tuesday: Facebook, FCC And More

Feb 5, 2019
Martin Meissner / Associated Press

Facebook at last count had attracted more than 2 billion users worldwide to its social media platform where they share photos, links, memories, life events and opinions.

But the amount of time they spend on the platform, even one that touts its users as friends, can have a negative effect on user’s wellbeing, according to a new, in-depth study.

We talk about what has been learned from people who give up Facebook today on Tech Tuesday on All Sides with Ann Fisher.

​Guests: 

Charles Barilleaux / Flickr

There is something millions of Ohioans take for granted that hundreds of thousands of others merely dream about: broadband service. All of Ohio’s major cities have it and some communities even offer it free to residents.

The Obama-era federal regulations known as net neutrality are done – at least for now. Though whether anything will change depends on where you live, and what internet service providers choose to do with their newfound freedom.

Gage Skidmore / Flickr

The U.S. Senate is set to vote this week on a resolution to undo the Trump administration’s repeal of “net neutrality” rules. Senate Democrats are forcing the vote less than a month before the new rules are scheduled to take effect.

The Federal Communications Commission says that its order ending an era of "net neutrality" — the rules that restrict Internet service providers' ability to slow down or speed up users' access to specific websites and apps — will take effect on June 11.

That is one day before the Senate's June 12 deadline to vote on a Congressional Review Act resolution filed by Sen. Edward Markey, D-Mass. The resolution aims to overturn the FCC's repeal of the Obama administration's Open Internet Order of 2015, which officially established net neutrality.

Ohio cities need three important utilities to stay viable: gas, electricity, and water. Now a fourth utility is pushing its way into the conversation: internet access. More specifically high-speed internet access. Where once communities have had to hope that private companies would provide that service, more and more local governments are taking on the responsibility themselves.  

In late 2014 Assistant Commerce Secretary Jay Williams came to Cleveland to announce a federal investment for a 100 gigabit trunk line that runs down right through the heart of the city.

The Federal Communications Commission is working toward officially taking current net neutrality rules off the books. The agency took the requisite formal step of publishing the rules on Thursday, opening the door for lawsuits from a number of state attorneys general and advocacy groups.

Here's a fantasy: A world where you never had to wait in line at the Department of Motor Vehicles. Save for the driving test, you could do almost everything online — from changing your address to renewing your license.

Other things in life — like voting and going to the doctor — would work just as efficiently. Any doctor you'd visit would already have access to your digitally stored medical records, and you’d never have to fill out one of those medical history forms in the waiting room.

Pages