insurrection

What do you call the people who violently stormed the Capitol on Jan. 6? Rioters? Insurrectionists? Terrorists? Since the attack, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has used all three labels.

Linda Sarsour, a Muslim, Palestinian American activist with a huge social media following, tweeted, "This is domestic terrorism. Period," and Republican Rep. Nancy Mace from South Carolina also used the label "domestic terrorist" in a tweet.

Updated: 5:18 p.m., Thursday, Jan. 14, 2021

Federal prosecutors accused a former Cleveland public schools employee of breaching the Senate chamber during last week’s pro-Trump storming of the U.S. Capitol building.

Christine Priola is charged with unlawful entry, disorderly conduct and unlawful activities on Capitol grounds, according to a criminal complaint filed in federal court Thursday.

Supporters of President Donald Trump gathered in front of the Ohio Statehouse on January 6 shortly before the insurrection at the U.S. Capitol.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

Gov. Mike DeWine announced Thursday that the Ohio Statehouse and state office buildings downtown will be closed from Sunday-Wednesday to prepare for armed protests ahead of President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration.

In late December, the New York Police Department sent a packet of material to the U.S. Capitol Police and the FBI. It was full of what's known as raw intelligence — bits and pieces of information that turned up by scraping various social media sites. It all indicated that there would likely be violence when lawmakers certified the presidential election on Jan. 6.

Rep. Anthony Gonzalez (R-Ohio) broke with his party Wednesday, voting to impeach President Donald Trump over last week’s riot at the U.S. Capitol Building.

Gonzalez, who just began his second term in the House, accused Trump of inciting the mob that stormed the Capitol Jan. 6 to disrupt the counting of electoral votes.

Updated at 7:13 p.m. ET

The House of Representatives voted Wednesday to impeach President Trump for "high crimes and misdemeanors" — specifically, for inciting an insurrection against the federal government at the U.S. Capitol.

Just one week before he will leave office, Trump has now become the first U.S. president to be impeached twice.

Wednesday's vote came a week after Trump supporters stormed the Capitol in a chaotic scene that left five people dead.

For the second time in his presidency, the House is moving to impeach Donald Trump, who will become the first president in history to undergo such a rebuke.

Throughout Wednesday's debate, Democrats portrayed Trump as an ongoing threat to the country and democracy, while Republicans largely either defended the president or argued that the impeachment process would only cause further division.

Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio, says an investigation is underway looking at "potentially members of Congress" who gave tours to pro-Trump rioters prior to the insurrection last week on the U.S. Capitol.

Watch Live: U.S. House Takes Up Second Trump Impeachment

Jan 13, 2021
Donald Trump - The Second Impeachment of President Trump - A PBS NewsHour Special
PBS NewsHour

Lawmakers in the U.S. House are gathering January 13 to debate an impeachment resolution based on a single charge against President Donald Trump— “incitement of insurrection.”

Up to a dozen House Republicans are likely to join Democrats on Wednesday in voting to impeach President Trump for inciting the attack on the U.S. Capitol one week ago, predicts Rep. Elissa Slotkin, a Democrat from Michigan.

Supporters of President Donald Trump gather outside the U.S. Capitol, Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021, in Washington.
Shafkat Anowar / AP

Ohio’s largest teachers' union says a sitting member of the state board of education has some explaining to do for her part in last week’s trip to the nation’s capitol.

A week ago, in the aftermath of a violent, destructive and deadly rampage of the U.S. Capitol by a mob of Trump supporters – a rampage that could have been much worse – we were inundated by tweets and press releases from Republicans in the Ohio congressional delegation decrying what had happened in their workplace, the very center of American democracy.

But barely a word about who inspired a frenzied mob of thugs to scale the walls and cause chaos in the halls of Congress – the president of the United States, Donald J. Trump.

Gov. Mike DeWine (R-Ohio) is activating 580 members of the Ohio National Guard to be ready for potential violent protests leading up to inauguration. Reports say armed supporters of President Donald Trump are planning for more protests in Washington, D.C. and even Ohio.

Sen. Rob Portman said Tuesday that President Donald Trump bears “some responsibility” for the riot at the U.S. Capitol last week, calling on the president to discourage violence in the days before President-elect Joe Biden’s inauguration.

“Both in his words before the attack on the Capitol and in his actions afterward, President Trump bears some responsibility for what happened on January 6,” Portman said in a statement released by his office Tuesday.

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