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11:00 At some schools, "C" is considered the gentleman's grade. But the "C" Ohio got on its March of Dimes report card has implications for ladies, too. This hour we'll talk more about the Buckeye State's premature birth rate. Then we'll get the latest on the controversy over new cholesterol medication guidelines, and what's new with Obamacare. Guests

Ohio's Health Care Ballot Issues

Jul 27, 2011

Now, the Ohio health care question has been cleared for the fall ballot... Ohio voters will decide whether Ohio can opt out of the national health care overhaul; as Secretary of State, Jon Husted, said Tuesday that opponents of the federal law have enough signatures to put a constitutional amendment on the Nov. 8 ballot. So what are the pros and cons if voters do choose to opt out of the health care overhaul, and what does this mean for health care in Ohio?

Survey Shows More Ohio Children Insured.

Mar 16, 2009

A new study shows that, compared to 2004, Ohio now has fewer children without medical insurance. But, more adults lack health coverage. The study was released this morning. Ohio Public Radio's Bill Cohen has the numbers.

The health insurance industry is entering the national conversation over how to heal America's health insurance problems and help the 47 million Americans who are uninsured - including 1.2 million Ohioans.

But critics are saying there's no way insurers will sacrifice their profit to provide better patient care. Ohio Public Radio's Karen Kasler reports.

As the City of Columbus copes with falling tax revenues and a rising budget defecit, employees continue to contribute little for their benefits. The amount of money Columbus employees pay each month for health insurance is far below the national average. Last month the Kaiser Family Foundation released its national health insurance premium survey. It found the average American in 2003 paid $200 a month for family health insurance coverage. City of Columbus employees pay no where near that amount. Most city employees pay about $50 a month for a family plan.

The high cost of health care has some Ohio State University graduate students in an uproar. About 50 graduate student employees gathered on the oval in front of the library Wednesday afternoon to rally in support of full health care coverage. Currently the university pays 42% of graduate teaching assistants' health care coverage. They want the university to fund 100% of the cost.

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