Innovation Ohio | WOSU Radio

Innovation Ohio

Ohio State Reps. Bob Cupp, R-Lima, left, and John Patterson, D-Jefferson, announce their proposed overhaul of Ohio's school funding formula at the Statehouse in Columbus, Monday, March 25, 2019.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Ohio lawmakers considering public input on proposed changes to school funding are hearing from interested parties who say it's a solid start, but want more: more money for certain schools, more clarity on charter-school funding changes and more help for the economically disadvantaged.

A classroom at Cleveland's John Hay High School.
Ashton Marra / Ideastream

House Speaker Larry Householder (R-Glenford) says when it comes to changing the funding structure for schools to create direct funding for charters, "I'm not sure if that's even a valid issue to discuss."

Charter school advocates are calling on lawmakers to bump up their funding for facilities. They say the money now going to charters falls well below what they need. But critics say more changes should be made before a funding increase. 

Kantele Franko / Associated Press

Many of the students enrolled in Ohio's largest online charter school when it closed in January have transferred to other schools, but state officials don't know what happened with about 2,300 students.

ECOT statehouse rally
Julie Carr Smyth / Associated Press

Education advocates held a small rally outside of Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine’s office on Monday, calling for him to investigate the now-closed Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow.

ECOT statehouse rally
Julie Carr Smyth / Associated Press

A progressive think tank says data from the Ohio Department of Education’s website shows not only how much state money went to the now-closed Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow, but also how much traditional public school districts lost to what was the state’s largest online charter school.

ECOT / Facebook

Longtime critics of the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow, the now-closed but still controversial online charter school, say that more employees would come forward with accusations of student data manipulation had they not signed contracts with non-disclosure agreements attached.

ECOT / Facebook

Thousands of students are either starting in a new school or still looking for a place to take classes after the closure of the state’s largest online charter school. The Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow is still fighting the state’s clawback of $60 million and blames the state Department of Education for its fate.