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income tax

Senate Finance Chair Matt Dolan (R-Chagrin Falls) gestures during a discussion about the Ohio Senate version of the budget as President Larry Obhof (R-Medina) looks on.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

Republican Senate leaders say the budget they released yesterday is not the final product, but it does represent some of the changes they wanted to make to the House’s spending plan.

Ohio Senate President Larry Obhof (R-Medina)
Ohio Senate

With the deadline to sign a new two-year budget a little over two weeks away, Ohio's state senators are releasing their proposal for that spending plan Tuesday. There are likely to be some changes from the $69 billion proposal that overwhelmingly passed the Ohio House last month.

Reporter Paige Pfleger holds up a letter from the Ohio Department of Taxation that threatened to withold her tax returns if she didn't complete an ID quiz.
Gabe Rosenberg / WOSU

Submitting your income tax returns in Ohio doesn’t necessarily mean you’ll get a refund right away. Sometimes, in order to get your money, there's a quiz standing in your way. I should know.

The $69 billion budget bill is on its way to the Ohio Senate after an overwhelming majority of Republicans and Democrats approved it in the House. The spending plan includes an income tax cut across the board.

Ohio House

The House will vote on its version of the $69 billion state budget Thursday, after the first unanimous committee vote in more than a decade.

Ohio House

The two-year, $69 billion state budget proposed by the Ohio House makes some significant changes to the state’s tax cutouts.

The early voting center at the Franklin County Board of Elections in Columbus.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Off-year elections don't often get a lot of attention from voters. Even less notice is paid to primary elections in an off-year. But Ohio voters will decide on many significant issues on May 7, in addition to selecting the candidates that will campaign through November.

Gov. Mike DeWine, center, speaks between Ohio Senate President Larry Obhof, left, and Ohio House Speaker Larry Householder during the Ohio State of the State address at the Ohio Statehouse in Columbus, Ohio, Tuesday, March 5, 2019.
Paul Vernon / Associated Press

State lawmakers have been advised by their economic researchers to cut the spending in Gov. Mike DeWine’s budget. But they may also add income tax cuts into the House version of the budget set to be released on Wednesday, something that DeWine deliberately left out.

Gov. Mike DeWine’s proposed 18-cent hike in the gas tax is still before state lawmakers. They would have to approve it as part of the transportation budget, which must be signed into law by March 31.

Medina Republican Larry Obhof
Ohio Senate

State lawmakers are now considering Gov. Mike DeWine’s 18 cent gas tax increase, to plug a hole of more than a billion dollars in the Department of Transportation’s budget. However one legislative leader says they’re also looking for ways to cut taxes again.

calculator accounting sheet
Ken Teegardin / Flickr

State income tax collections have been down for the last two months, leading some to wonder whether Ohio will end the fiscal year with a surplus – or in the red.

Ohio Statehouse
Alexander Smith / Wikimedia Commons

For the second month in a row, the state collected more income taxes than forecasts suggested it would. Statehouse correspondent Karen Kasler reports that’s quite a turnaround from last year, when the two-year state budget had to be trimmed as income taxes fell nearly $850 million short.

Updated 9:45 a.m. ET

The White House is banging the drums that President Trump is doing something big again ahead of his 100th day in office — unveiling a tax "plan."

"This is going to be the biggest tax cut and the largest tax reform in the history of our country," Trump's Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin said at a panel Wednesday morning.

Ohio Governor John Kasich unveils the state budget on January 30, 2017.
Dan Konik

The House version of Gov. John Kasich’s budget comes out tomorrow, and it’s expected to include a lot of changes.

Months of tax revenues coming in under estimates have Gov. John Kasich trimming back his two-year state budget by $800 million. Statehouse correspondent Karen Kasler reports that has budget watchers wondering what will be cut.

Nothing is off limits

The state has a $615 million shortfall in this year’s budget, with revenues coming in behind forecasts for eight of the last nine months. With that in mind, Gov. John Kasich announced he’s pulling back his budget proposal by $400 million for each of the two years in the spending plan. 

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