Impeachment

From left, Jared Kushner and his wife Ivanka Trump, Eric and Lara Trump, Kimberly Guilfoyle and Donald Trump Jr., Tiffany Trump, President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump and Barron Trump stand at the White House on Aug. 27, 2020.
Alex Brandon / Associated Press

In this week's episode of Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU, hosts Mike Thompson and Steve Brown discuss the Republican National Convention and President Trump's pitch to voters for a second term. Ohio State political scientist Paul Beck joins the show.

Ohio Rep. Nino Vitale (R-Urbana)
Ohio House

Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose has referred state Rep. Nino Vitale (R-Urbana) to the Ohio Elections Commission based on several potential campaign finance issues. Among the referrals is a claim that Vitale mixed funds from personal or business accounts with his campaign account.

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine speaks during an interview in Columbus in this Dec. 13, 2019 file photo.
John Minchillo / AP

Gov. Mike DeWine has a message for the handful of fellow Republicans in the legislature trying to impeach him: "Have at it." 

Gov. Mike DeWine inside the Governor's Residence in Columbus on Dec. 13, 2019.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Ohio House Republicans aren’t uniting behind a plan to impeach Gov. Mike DeWine over his handling of the coronavirus pandemic. And if the conservative lawmakers want support from Democrats, they might be disappointed.

Updated: 5:36 p.m., Monday, Aug. 24, 2020

For the first time in more than a century, Ohio lawmakers have filed articles of impeachment against a sitting governor.

State Rep. John Becker (R-Union Township) is putting the matter forward over fellow Republican Gov. Mike DeWine’s response to the coronavirus.

A federal appeals court ruled Tuesday that the Justice Department must give House lawmakers secret grand jury materials from former special counsel Robert Mueller's Russia investigation.

The 2-1 decision from a three-judge panel on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit upholds a district court ruling from last year and gives House Democrats a victory in their ongoing legal battles with the Trump administration.

Sen. Portman (R-OH) in Columbus.
Nick Evans / WOSU

Ohio Republican Senator Rob Portman met with local housing officials in Columbus Friday to discuss his efforts to reduce evictions.

Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., says that the months-long impeachment inquiry and Senate trial was "absolutely worth it," even though the Senate ultimately voted to acquit President Trump of the abuse of power and obstruction of Congress charges against him.

In two separate speeches on Thursday, President Trump, buoyed by his acquittal in the Senate impeachment trial a day earlier, continued to lash out at the lone Republican who voted to convict and remove him from office — Sen. Mitt Romney of Utah.

But the president's ire against the former GOP presidential nominee began just after midnight when he tweeted his displeasure with Romney, while needling him for coming up short during his White House bid in 2012.

President Donald Trump speaks in the East Room of the White House, Thursday, Feb. 6, 2020, in Washington, following his acquittal by the U.S. Senate..
Evan Vucci / Associated Press

In this week's episode of Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU, hosts Mike Thompson and Steve Brown review a week jam-packed with political drama, from the disastrous caucus in Iowa to the President's victory lap after his acquittal by the Senate.

Kurt Pyle, political science professor at Kenyon College, joins the show.

Updated at 2:42 p.m. ET

President Trump declared victory on Thursday, a day after being acquitted by the Senate on two articles of impeachment, and lashed out at his political opponents in lengthy extemporaneous remarks.

"We went through hell, unfairly. I did nothing wrong," he said in a public statement from the White House.

"It was all bulls***," he said, tracing his impeachment woes back to investigations into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential campaign.

Updated at 5:43 p.m. ET

Senators voted on Wednesday afternoon to acquit President Trump on two articles of impeachment — abuse of power and obstruction of Congress — after a historically unusual but typically contentious trial.

Forty-eight senators supported a verdict of guilty on Article I; 52 voted not guilty. Forty-seven senators supported a verdict of guilty on Article II; 53 voted not guilty. The Senate would have needed 67 votes to convict Trump on either article.

President Donald Trump - The Trump Impeachment Trial - February 5, 2020 - PBS NewsHour
PBS NewsHour

Senators voted Wednesday to acquit President Donald Trump of two articles of impeachment–abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. Trump will remain in office after Democrats fell short of the two-thirds majority needed to remove him.

Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, comments on the final statement of House Democratic impeachment manager House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., on Jan. 24, 2020.
Jacquelyn Martin / Associated Press

Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio) said Wednesday that he will vote to convict President Trump on two articles of impeachment. His comments came hours ahead of a Senate vote that's expected to fall short of the tally needed to remove Trump from office.

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., says the House expects to continue its investigations into President Trump's conduct, even after Wednesday's expected acquittal of Trump in the Senate impeachment trial.

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