Impeachment

For the first time since the Jan. 6 mob attack on the U.S. Capitol, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell publicly denounced President Trump and his supporters for instigating the insurrection.

"The mob was fed lies," McConnell, R-Ky., said in a speech on the Senate floor Tuesday afternoon.

"They were provoked by the president and other powerful people, and they tried to use fear and violence to stop a specific proceeding of the first branch of the federal government, which they did not like."

Almost 6 in 10 Americans said they blame President Trump for the violent insurrection that took place Jan. 6 at the U.S. Capitol by a mob of his supporters, according to the latest NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll.

But they are split on whether Congress should continue to take action against him after he leaves office next week, and half believe social media companies such as Facebook and Twitter — which have banned him from their platforms — should not continue to restrict Trump after Wednesday.

On Wednesday, Kamala Harris will become the first woman, and the first woman of color, to serve as vice president of the United States.

Twelve years ago, hundreds of thousands of people filled the National Mall to watch Barack Obama make history as the nation's first Black president.

But when Harris takes the oath, the mall will very likely be nearly empty.

Ohio Republican Rep. Anthony Gonzalez’s vote in favor of impeaching President Donald Trump Wednesday went against the majority of his party, and could ultimately cost him the support of some constituents.

Unlike typical legislative actions, an impeachment vote garners more attention from constituents, said Case Western Reserve University Associate Professor of Political Science Justin Buchler.

In this Tuesday, Feb. 11, 2020, file photo, Rep. Anthony Gonzalez, R-Ohio, speaks during a Senate Commerce subcommittee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, on intercollegiate athlete compensation.
Susan Walsh / Associated Press

In this week's episode of Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU, hosts Mike Thompson and Steve Brown discuss the part Ohio's congressional delegation played in the impeachment of President Trump.

National Politics With Ken Rudin

Jan 14, 2021
 President Donald Trump speaks during a roundtable discussion with African-American supporters in the Cabinet Room of the White House, Wednesday, June 10, 2020, in Washington.
Patrick Semansky / AP

In an historic vote and with bipartisan support, the U.S. House of Representatives impeached President Donald Trump for a second time Wednesday, charging him with inciting an attack on his own government.

The vote came one week after pro-Trump rioters stormed the Capitol in an effort to derail lawmakers’ efforts to certify Joe Biden as the next president.

One week after a violent mob breached the U.S. Capitol, threatened lawmakers and forced evacuations, members returned to the House floor. What followed was an emotional, and often angry, debate about recrimination for the president who many argued incited the riot that resulted in five dead.

Rep. Anthony Gonzalez (R-Ohio) broke with his party Wednesday, voting to impeach President Donald Trump over last week’s riot at the U.S. Capitol Building.

Gonzalez, who just began his second term in the House, accused Trump of inciting the mob that stormed the Capitol Jan. 6 to disrupt the counting of electoral votes.

Updated at 7:13 p.m. ET

The House of Representatives voted Wednesday to impeach President Trump for "high crimes and misdemeanors" — specifically, for inciting an insurrection against the federal government at the U.S. Capitol.

Just one week before he will leave office, Trump has now become the first U.S. president to be impeached twice.

Wednesday's vote came a week after Trump supporters stormed the Capitol in a chaotic scene that left five people dead.

For the second time in his presidency, the House is moving to impeach Donald Trump, who will become the first president in history to undergo such a rebuke.

Throughout Wednesday's debate, Democrats portrayed Trump as an ongoing threat to the country and democracy, while Republicans largely either defended the president or argued that the impeachment process would only cause further division.

Watch Live: U.S. House Takes Up Second Trump Impeachment

Jan 13, 2021
Donald Trump - The Second Impeachment of President Trump - A PBS NewsHour Special
PBS NewsHour

Lawmakers in the U.S. House are gathering January 13 to debate an impeachment resolution based on a single charge against President Donald Trump— “incitement of insurrection.”

Up to a dozen House Republicans are likely to join Democrats on Wednesday in voting to impeach President Trump for inciting the attack on the U.S. Capitol one week ago, predicts Rep. Elissa Slotkin, a Democrat from Michigan.

Eight days from the end of his presidency, President Trump expressed no regret for his comments last week ahead of a riot and mob violence at the U.S. Capitol that resulted in the deaths of at least five people and multiple injuries.

"People thought that what I said was totally appropriate," Trump said Tuesday when asked about his role in the siege, despite many at the highest levels of government — Republicans and Democrats — saying otherwise, three of his Cabinet members having resigned and a second impeachment effort now underway.

Congressional Response To U.S. Capitol Insurrection

Jan 12, 2021
Trump supporters try to break through a police barrier, Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021, at the Capitol in Washington.
Julio Cortez / AP

House Democrats on Monday took the first step toward impeaching President Donald Trump for inciting the violent insurrection at the U.S. Capitol. Today, members are expected to vote on a resolution calling on Vice President Mike Pence to invoke the 25th Amendment and declare Trump unfit for office.

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