hydroxychloroquine

A pharmacist holds a bottle of the drug hydroxychloroquine in Oakland, California
Ben Margot / AP

The Ohio Board of Pharmacy has reversed course on banning the use of hydroxychloroquine as a treatment for COVID-19, after pushback from Gov. Mike DeWine.

prescription medicine pills spilling out of a bottle
Adam / Wikipedia

The FDA has revoked permission for hydroxychloroquine to be used as a treatment for COVID-19, after the drug was publicly touted by President Donald Trump. That leaves the state of Ohio with a stockpile of millions of pills.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today withdrew a special status known as emergency use authorization for the drugs chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine.

Emergency use authorization is designed to facilitate the availability of drugs needed during public health emergencies. It allows unapproved medical products or unapproved uses of approved medical products to be used in such emergencies.

Taking hydroxychloroquine after being exposed to someone with COVID-19 does not protect someone from getting the disease.

That's the conclusion of a study published Wednesday involving 821 participants. All had direct exposure to a COVID-19 patient, either because they lived with one, or were a health care provider or first responder.

The World Health Organization says it is temporarily halting its clinical trials that use hydroxychloroquine to treat COVID-19 patients over published concerns that the drug may do more harm than good.

The move comes after the medical journal The Lancet reported on Friday that patients getting hydroxychloroquine were dying at higher rates than other coronavirus patients.