hospitals

A new report found some people may pay about $13,000 for a bypass heart surgery at one hospital, but another Ohio hospital may charge them hundreds of thousands of dollars more for the same procedure.

Policy researchers at the Cleveland-based Center for Community Solutions compiled price data for six common medical procedures at Ohio’s 206 hospitals. 

An NPR investigation has found irregularities in the process by which the Trump administration awarded a multi-million dollar contract to a Pittsburgh company to collect key data about COVID-19 from the country's hospitals.

The contract is at the center of a controversy over the administration's decision to move that data reporting function from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention — which has tracked infection information for a range of illnesses for years — to the Department of Health and Human Services.

Urgent care at Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, on March 31, 2020.
David Holm / WOSU

Nationwide Children’s Hospital has a new Chief Medical Officer. Dr. Rustin Morse is a faculty member at The Ohio State University and a pediatric emergency room physician.

Inside the Greater Columbus Convention Center, hundreds of makeshift hospital rooms have been set up for coronavirus patients.
Greater Columbus Convention Center

There were more than 1,400 new confirmed cases of COVID-19 reported in Ohio on Thursday, with 21 new confirmed deaths. The numbers of people hospitalized with the coronavirus are also at their highest levels so far in the pandemic, but the state’s hospitals say they’re ready.

Updated at 10:30 a.m. ET

The renewed surge in coronavirus cases has left some states once again scrambling to find supplies of masks, gowns, gloves and other medical supplies. The shortages have drawn attention to President Trump's plan to help rebuild the national stockpile of these supplies — a plan that involves a little-known foreign investment agency.

Brazil, the second worst country in the world for COVID-19 cases, is getting some help from Cincinnati. The new non-profit Venti-Now will send ventilators there for free that it designed, built and tested in just three weeks. Tanzania is also on the list to get them.

Fresh off a Caribbean cruise in early March, John Campbell developed a cough and fever of 104 degrees. He went to his primary care physician and got a flu test, which came up negative.

Then things got strange. Campbell says the doctor then turned to him and said, "I've called the ER next door, and you need to go there. This is a matter of public health. They're expecting you."

It was March 3, and no one had an inkling yet of just how bad the COVID-19 pandemic would become in the United States.

Starr Roden, left, a registered nurse and immunization outreach coordinator with the Knox County Health Department, administers a vaccination to Jonathan Detweiler, 6, at the facility in Mount Vernon, Ohio.
Paul Vernon / Associated Press

Child vaccinations in Ohio dropped dramatically in the first full month after the state shut down due to the coronavirus pandemic.

As doctors around the country have expressed concerns that people are avoiding hospitals due to the pandemic, Gov. Mike DeWine (R-Ohio) is urging Ohioans to continue seeking care for other ailments outside of the coronavirus. 

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, center, tours decontamination units at a COVID-19 testing site with Sean Harrington, of Battelle Critical Care Decontamination System, right, on Wednesday, May 6, 2020, in Miami Gardens.
Lynne Sladky / Associated Press

In late March, workers at a Columbus warehouse were loading Battelle’s Critical Care Decontamination Systems onto truck beds. The technology is the first of its kind – modular so they could be easily shipped to coronavirus hot spots, with the promise of being able to clean 80,000 pieces of personal protective equipment for re-use up to 20 times.

On April 1 Teasha Tennyson gave birth to a six-pound, five-ounce baby at Good Samaritan Hospital. She'd already had a less than ideal birthing process there with her first child.

The Ohio Department of Health (ODH) announced Wednesday the state has received enough remdesivir from the federal government to treat about 100 patients.

The antiviral drug has shown promise treating COVID-19 patients and received Emergency Use Authorization recently from the Food and Drug Administration.

Two F-16s and a KC-135 with the 121st Air Refueling Wing of the Ohio National Guard conduct a flyby near the Wexner Medical Center.
Debbie Holmes / WOSU

The Ohio Air National Guard conducted a flyby Wednesday over several Columbus-area hospitals to honor the work of health care professionals, first responders, military personnel, and other essential workers during the pandemic. 

As hospitals were overrun by coronavirus patients in other parts of the world, the Army Corps of Engineers mobilized in the U.S., hiring private contractors to build emergency field hospitals around the country.

The endeavor cost more than $660 million, according to an NPR analysis of federal spending records.

But nearly four months into the pandemic, most of these facilities haven't treated a single patient.

Registered Nurse Janice Tatonetti, right, takes the temperature of Harry Pearson before he votes in Ohio's primary election at the Cuyahoga County Board of Elections, Tuesday, April 28, 2020, in Cleveland.
Tony Dejak / Associated Press

The nurse I’m speaking with over Zoom is rolling dough while her kids play in the background. She’s making three loaves of bread.

“I’m used to doing like a million things at once, so I can talk,” she assures me.

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