Homeland Security | WOSU Radio

Homeland Security

Updated at 2:20 p.m. ET

Migrants who cross the U.S. Southern border and seek asylum will be required to wait in Mexico while their claims are being processed, Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen said Thursday.

Currently, most people requesting asylum are allowed to stay in the U.S. — sometimes in detention — while their claim is pending in immigration court. The new policy will send such migrants to Mexico for the duration of that process.

Updated Friday at 5:08 p.m. ET

The Trump administration is taking steps to stem the flow of Central American migrants crossing the U.S. border from Mexico.

The administration issued a new rule Thursday designed to prohibit migrants who cross the border outside of designated entry points from seeking asylum in the United States.

Two new reports from the Department of Homeland Security's internal watchdog say the agency was unprepared to implement the Trump administration's family separation policy and detail health and safety risks at a California ICE processing facility.

President Trump's immigration crackdown has not come cheap.

Take the cost of deportation: Immigration and Customs Enforcement has its own airline operation to fly deportees back home. So far this fiscal year, it's $107 million over budget.

Some physicians who examined immigrants while working for the federal government had histories of diluting vaccinations, exploiting women and hiring a hit man to kill a dissatisfied patient, according to a scathing report released by the Department of Homeland Security's internal watchdog.

Updated at 11:13 p.m. ET

Immigrants who benefit from various forms of public assistance, including food stamps and housing subsidies, would face sharp new hurdles to obtaining a green card under a proposed rule announced by the Trump administration on Saturday.

New court filings released late Thursday indicate that the Department of Justice and immigration advocates are still far apart in working out a process for reuniting migrant families who were separated under the Trump administration's zero-tolerance immigration policy.

Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar says that the government will meet deadlines imposed by a federal judge to reunite migrant families that have been separated by the U.S. government.

At the same time, he criticized the deadlines as "artificial" and said that they could prevent the government "from completing our standard — or even a truncated — vetting process."

The Trump administration's separation policy has been met with widespread outcry, marches and legal action.

The Department of Defense plans to start building tent encampments on two military bases in Texas to house migrant families apprehended at the border. Construction is expected to begin after the July 4 holiday.

The Pentagon said in a statement that the Department of Homeland Security asked the Defense Department to house and care for an "alien family population" of up to 12,000 people.

Ohio U.S. Senator Rob Portman
J. Scott Applewhite / Associated Press

Ohio’s Rob Portman was among the U.S. senators on Tuesday who grilled the secretary of Health and Human Services about how it has handled thousands of children of immigrants separated from their parents.

Updated at 7:55 p.m. ET

Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen is continuing to defend the Trump administration's controversial "zero tolerance" policy that results in separating children from their parents who enter the U.S. illegally.

Nielsen appeared at the White House press briefing on Monday, falsely blaming Democrats for the current crisis and arguing that the impetus is on Congress to pass a law to close legal loopholes.

Rep. Tim Ryan / Facebook

The case of a Youngstown businessman took another dramatic turn on Thursday. As Amer Othman Adi sat in the Geauga County Jail, on a hunger strike and awaiting deportation, lawmakers pushed to grant him a six-month stay while his case goes under further review.

The Department of Homeland Security leadership is withholding an internal watchdog's report detailing the government's messy rollout of President Trump's travel ban, including the violation of two federal court orders.

The executive order banning people from seven mostly Muslim nations from entering the U.S. was suddenly implemented on Jan. 27.

The DHS inspector general found that the leaders of Customs and Border Protection, the agency charged with implementing the order, "had virtually no warning" the order was to be issued or of its scope and was "caught by surprise."

Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted
Ohio Public Radio

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security has reached out to elections officials in Ohio and 20 other states, which have confirmed they were targeted by hackers during the 2016 election. Ohio’s chief elections official said he thinks the story isn't as shocking as it may seem.

Updated at 4:50 p.m. ET

The Department of Homeland Security announced Tuesday that it will use its authority to bypass environmental laws and other regulations to "ensure the expeditious construction of barriers and roads" near the U.S.-Mexico border south of San Diego.

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