HIV

Public health organizations such as the CDC report older individuals are more susceptible to falling seriously ill from COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus. But so are those with long-term illnesses, such as people who are living with HIV/AIDS.

"There is a high risk for patients with HIV whose immunity is compromised," said Dr. Elie Saade, Medical Director of Infection Control at University Hospitals. 

When President Trump announced Wednesday that Vice President Mike Pence would oversee the government effort to contain the fast-spreading coronavirus, he said the former Indiana governor "has a certain talent for this."

But not everyone agrees.

Pence's public health record, especially while he was governor, is now coming under harsh scrutiny.

Congressional leaders on Thursday said lawmakers are nearing a bipartisan plan to issue significant emergency funding to address rising fears sparked by the spread of coronavirus.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Thursday she had spoken with Vice President Mike Pence, who was tasked to lead the administration's response to the outbreak. She added that lawmakers were nearing a plan to fund the U.S. response.

HIV testing at Mozaic, an Equitas Health clinic in Columbus.
Equitas Health

Columbus City Council will vote Monday to devoting more than $280,000 to HIV prevention efforts. 

In more than 30 states, it is illegal for someone with HIV to have sex without first disclosing their status. Some are now pushing to change that, arguing that the laws are actually endangering public health.

More than 1 million people in the U.S. are living with HIV, and their HIV status could conceivably put them behind bars. That's what happened to Michael Holder.

"I served 8 1/2 years in prison and three years after on parole," Holder says.

The Trump administration Tuesday unveiled a plan to distribute HIV prevention medication free to individuals who do not have prescription drug insurance coverage.

HIV testing at Mozaic, an Equitas Health clinic in Columbus.
Equitas Health

Graig Cote has had HIV for 33 years, and he wants everyone to know it.

Only a small percentage of women in Cleveland are aware of a drug that can help prevent HIV infection, according to a new report.

Less than 15 percent of the 351 heterosexual women surveyed knew about pre-exposure prophylaxis, commonly known as PrEP. It’s a pill that can help prevent those who are at a high risk of contracting HIV from getting the disease.

MetroHealth researcher Milana Bogorodskaya led the study and said PrEP was primarily marketed to men when it first came out in 2012.

Gene editing, or the process of making specific changes to DNA, is already helping cancer patients and people with certain inherited diseases. The technology may eventually lead to a cure for AIDS.

Carlos Malvestutto works on infectious diseases at the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

There are about 230 new cases of HIV in Franklin County every year, mostly among people aged 25-29. On Thursday, celebrated as National HIV Testing Day, free testing is available at multiple locations across the city. 

Updated at 5:10 p.m. ET

The Trump administration is placing new restrictions on the use of human fetal tissue in medical research. Federal scientists working at the National Institutes of Health will be prohibited from obtaining new tissue samples from elective abortions for ongoing research projects at NIH.

Abortion-rights opponents hailed the move as a first step toward a complete ban on the use of human fetal tissue in research.

Jarun Ontakrai / Shutterstock

President Trump announced a new plan to end the HIV epidemic in America by 2030 in his State of the Union address Tuesday. Ohio is one major target of the initiative.

Eight investigators from the Centers for Disease Control are in Greater Cincinnati for the next several weeks trying to determine similarities in HIV cases among intravenous drug users on both sides of the Ohio River. It's hoped their findings can help prevent new cases.

Wellness Wednesday: New Transgender Wellness Center

Oct 17, 2018
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

Health services for transgender and gender non-conforming people are now available in Columbus.

Mozaic offers free HIV, including services that help build community and provide a safe space for youth.

Today on All Sides, Columbus’ first transgender wellness center and more on Wellness Wednesday.

Paige Pfleger / WOSU

Mozaic, Ohio’s first standalone transgender and gender non-conforming health and community center, officially opens its doors Friday.

Pages