history

Imagine you're a military officer in World War I. Armies have grown so large, you can no longer communicate just by the sound of your voice or the wave of your hand. You need to synchronize movements of troops and artillery, far and wide.

You need a wristwatch.

Quick quiz: What do Judy Garland's rendition of "Over the Rainbow," N.W.A's seminal Straight Outta Compton and the inaugural episode of NPR's All Things Considered have in common?

That little riddle just got a little easier to answer on Wednesday: The Library of Congress announced that all three "aural treasures" — along with roughly two dozen other recordings — have been inducted into its National Recording Registry.

In March of 1907, Congress passed the Expatriation Act, which decreed, among other things, that U.S. women who married non-citizens were no longer Americans. If their husband later became a naturalized citizen, they could go through the naturalization process to regain citizenship.

But none of these rules applied to American men when they chose a spouse.

Now, it's no surprise that Neanderthals didn't brush their teeth. Nor did they go to the dentist.

That means bits of food and the microbes in their mouths just stayed stuck to their teeth. While not so good for dental hygiene, these dental plaques are a great resource for scientists interested in understanding more about Neanderthal diet and lifestyle.

Debbie Holmes

What was the site of the nation’s first ever public housing complex is getting a second life. As residents begin moving into new housing at the old Poindexter Village, though, many see the complex as a site of lost history. 

Statehouse Celebrates Ohio's Birthday With Tours, Trivia

Feb 27, 2017
Ohio Statehouse
Alexander Smith / Wikimedia Commons

Ohio is celebrating 214 years of statehood this year, and the Statehouse in Columbus is marking the occasion with a family-friendly party on March 5.

Valentine's Day is a time to celebrate romance and love and kissy-face fealty. But the origins of this festival of candy and cupids are actually dark, bloody — and a bit muddled.

Ten thousand years ago, at the dawn of the agricultural revolution, many of our worst infectious diseases didn't exist.

Here's what changed.

With the rise of agriculture, for the first time in history humans were living in close contact with domesticated animals — milking them, taking care of them and, of course, eating them. All that touching and sharing gave animal germs plenty of chances to get inside us.

On his first day on the job, President Trump made some changes to the Oval Office; he installed gold drapes and moved some statues. First Families have some leeway to make changes to the White House, and that includes changes to its art collection.

It can take many hands — or eyes — for one work of art to make it into the White House. Take, for example, the large painting the Obamas hung in what's called the Treaty Room.

The bustling Paris streets were rutted and caked in thick mud, but there was always a breathtaking sight to behold in the shop windows of Patisserie de la Rue de la Paix. By 1814, people crowded outside the bakery, straining for a glimpse of the latest confection created by the young chef who worked inside.

On Tuesday, President Obama will give his farewell address to the nation. It's a custom that goes all the way back to George Washington; these speeches, author John Avlon says, "serve as a bookend to a presidency."

For about 150 years, Washington's farewell speech was the most famous in American history, Avlon tells NPR's Michel Martin: "It was more widely reprinted than the Declaration of Independence. And yet today, it's almost entirely forgotten."

It's hard to imagine a time when red and green weren't synonymous with Christmas, but they haven't always been the holiday's go-to colors. Arielle Eckstut, co-author of Secret Language of Color, attributes the palette's rise to two things: holly and Coca-Cola.

Ancient Ohio Grist Mill Set To Grind Again

Nov 13, 2016
Sam Hendren / 89.7 NPR News

A nearly 190-year-old grist mill in Fairfield County will spring back to life next month.  A $1 million restoration will soon be complete. 

The U.S. Department of the Interior has named the village of Zoar a national historical landmark.

The village was founded by German religious dissenters in the 1800’s.  

Tammi Mackey-Shrum, is Zoar’s site director.


All Sides Weekend: Chefs in the City - Lost Restaurants

Dec 4, 2015
Arcadia Publishing & The History Press

Columbus is known for many things, especially its food scene. From German immigrants to High Street eateries to all the fads of the time, a new book explores the many lost and beloved restaurants of the city's past. Join WOSU NPR News’ All Things Considered host, Marilyn Smith, for a discussion about the vibrant restaurant culture of historical Columbus.

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