history

Michael Stinziano/Facebook

After an eight month hiatus, the Columbus Historical Society has re-opened its doors in a new location in Franklinton.

The History, Culture and Identity of the Midwest

Aug 18, 2017
tpsDave / Pixabay

Today at 10am 

The Midwest used to be considered the moral heartland of the United States. Over the years it lost this title and became known as "flyover country." The coastal denizens came to denigrate the values and steadiness of the region and that has influenced the work of historians since the 1920.

We hear from Jon Lauck, author of From Warm Center to Ragged Edge: The Erosion of Midwestern Literary and Historical Regionalism, 1920-1965.

Rock art images of bulls, bison, horses, lions, rhinoceros, and other animals from caves like Lascaux and Chauvet in France and Altamira in Spain have become popular icons showcasing the antiquity of human-animal relationships, as well as human creativity.

One hundred years ago, the U.S. entered the first global war — an ugly, dirty, agonizing conflict that cost millions of lives and changed the world. Now, the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C., is observing the centennial with art and artifacts in an exhibition called Artist Soldiers.

Great Lakes Today

Two replica Christopher Columbus ships are sailing across the Great Lakes this summer, offering visitors a chance to learn about the famous explorer's voyages. But Native American activists say the ships only tell half of a story.

There’s more than just fish and sand in the Great Lakes.   According to the Great Lakes Shipwreck Museum in Michigan, there are over 6,000 shipwrecks in the lakes – and an estimated 30,000 lives lost.


Dan Timmermann

This story is part of the Curious Cbus project. You ask the questions, you vote for one of the questions and we answer.

The History, Culture and Identity of the Midwest

Jul 10, 2017
tpsDave / Pixabay

The Midwest used to be considered the moral heartland of the United States. Over the years it lost this title and became known as "flyover country." The coastal denizens came to denigrate the values and steadiness of the region and that has influenced the work of historians since the 1920.

 

We hear from Jon Lauck, author of From Warm Center to Ragged Edge: The Erosion of Midwestern Literary and Historical Regionalism, 1920-1965.

 

It has been 80 years since Amelia Earhart vanished while trying to become the first female pilot to fly around the world, and her 1937 disappearance has become one of the great mysteries of our time.

If you crack open a beer this Fourth of July, history might not be the first thing on your mind. But for Theresa McCulla, the first brewing historian at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History, the story of beer is the story of America.

"If you want to talk about the history of immigration in America, or urbanization or the expansion of transportation networks, really any subject that you want to explore, you can talk about it through beer," McCulla says.

Confederate Monuments

Jun 30, 2017
Ron Cogswell / Flickr

What do confederate monuments represent now? Some see them as a reminder of our nation's history with slavery and white supremacy. Others argue the monuments reflect a period of our nation's history and that is why they should not be removed. This argument is part of a movement to remove confederate monuments from public spaces.

Today, we talk about confederate monuments in New Orleans and Ohio. 

Religion has played an outsized role in U.S. history and politics, but it's one that has often gone unrecognized in U.S. museums.

"As a focused subject area, it's been neglected," says Peter Manseau, a scholar and writer installed last year as the first full-time religion curator at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History.

Tales from the American West are marked by heroism, romance and plenty of cruelty. Among those stories, the saga of the Donner Party stands alone — a band of pioneers set out in covered wagons for California, and eventually, stranded, snowbound and starving, resorted to cannibalism.

Confederate Monuments

Jun 19, 2017
Ron Cogswell / Flickr

What do confederate monuments represent now? Some see them as a reminder of our nation's history with slavery and white supremacy. Others argue the monuments do reflect a period of our nation's history and that is why they should not be removed. This argument is part of a movement to remove confederate monuments from public spaces.

Today, we talk about confederate monuments in New Orleans and Ohio. 

In most American cities these days, it seems like there's a Chinese restaurant on every other street corner.

But in the late 1800s, that ubiquity was exactly what certain white establishment figures feared, according to a new study co-written by Gabriel "Jack" Chin, a law professor at the University of California, Davis.

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