hate crimes | WOSU Radio

hate crimes

 James Reardon, Jr.
Mahoning County Sheriff's Office

A 20-year-old Ohio man has pleaded not guilty to threatening a Jewish community center in a video posted to Instagram.

Avowed neo-Nazi James Fields Jr. was given a second sentence of life in prison for killing a woman and injuring dozens when he rammed his car into a group of people protesting a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Va., in 2017.

On Monday, Charlottesville Circuit Judge Richard Moore sentenced Fields to the life term plus 419 years and $480,000 in fines, in keeping with a jury's recommendation.

Updated at 6:32 p.m. ET

The man who drove his car into a crowd of anti-racist protesters in Charlottesville, Va., killing one person and injuring 35 has been sentenced to spending the rest of his life in prison.

A federal judge issued the sentence of life without the possibility of parole on Friday for self-proclaimed neo-Nazi James Fields Jr., 22, of the Toledo, Ohio, area.

Worshipers at the Noor Islamic Cultural Center in Columbus.
Noor Islamic Cultural Center / Facebook

Last month, a gunman killed 50 people and injured 50 others at a mosque and Islamic center in New Zealand. In response to that and other recent attacks, the Franklin County Sheriff’s Office is hosting a roundtable on how to protect houses of worship from domestic terrorism and hate crimes.

The Anti-Defamation League has identified 1,986 anti-Semitic incidents in its 2017 Audit of Anti-Semitic Incidents. That's up from 1,267 in 2016, marking the highest single-year increase since the organization released its first audit in 1979.

Spelman AME Church / Facebook

An African-American church in Kent has been vandalized for the second time within the last few months.

Hilltop Historical Society

Earlier this week, before a press conference about the arrests of gang members, the U.S. Attorney for Ohio’s southern district, Ben Glassman, did something unexpected: He spoke out against the violence in Charlottesville, Va.

A Jewish advocacy organization expects a staggering increase in anti-Semitic incidents by the end of 2017. That projection comes after the Anti-Defamation League counted an 86 percent spike in attacks on Jews and Jewish institutions so far this year, according to a report released Monday.

Since Donald Trump was elected president some police and advocacy groups have seen an increase in reports of attacks based on race, religion, gender and sexual orientation. But if you're looking for the total number of hate crimes that took place in the U.S. this year — that's one number that even the FBI can't provide with certainty.

10 am

Amish hate crimes. It’s not a common phrase, but in 2012 members of a breakaway Amish group were convicted of federal hate crimes against members of their own faith. Recently a court overturned those charges, potentially redefining laws regarding victims from protected classes. We’ll discuss the current case, and look back at the violence a peace-loving community perpetrated against itself.

Guests

11:00 Columbus has experienced a string of attacks targeting gay men in the last two weeks. The assaults and robberies occurred just as the city gears up for its 2013 Pride Festival, and authorities say hate crimes are more common than reported. This hour, we'll take a look at this disturbing trend, and hear from advocates about what they're doing to help. Guests