Harlem renaissance | WOSU Radio

Harlem renaissance

Earlier this year, Classical 101 and the Columbus Museum of Art collaborated for Portraits of Langston, a program featuring music by composers Valerie Coleman and William Grant Still. This weekend, Classical 101 is broadcasting some highlights from that concert.

color photo of augusta savage sculpture called gamin
Smithsonian American Art Museum

All around the city, Columbus has been celebrating the 100th anniversary of the Harlem Renaissance in a big way.

As the commemorative events draw to a close later this month, Classical 101 and the Columbus Museum of Art are joining forces Saturday, Jan. 12 for Portraits of Langston, a program featuring music by two groundbreaking composers – one contemporary, one historical.

All Sides Weekend: Arts

Oct 26, 2018
Holger Langmaier / Pixabay

Join host Christopher Purdy for a discussion about the Broadway show "Aladdin" opening in Columbus, and the Harlem Renaissance celebration. 

Carl Van Vechten / Wikimedia Commons

William Grant Still is best known today for his Afro-American Symphony. Still composed the work in 1930 and strove in the symphony to – in his words – "portray the sons of the soil, who still retain so many of the traits of their African forebears."

Regina Fleming / morningsideopera.com

Harry Lawrence Freeman was arguably the most important African-American composer of opera working during the era of the Harlem Renaissance.

Library of Congress

By the height of the Harlem Renaissance in the early 20th century, the tradition of arranging African-American spirituals for concert performance had strongly emerged.

White Studio / The New York Public Library Digital Collections

The next time you see a magpie in the sky, I hope you'll remember Four Saints in Three Acts.

Pixabay

Join us today as we broadcast live from the 2018 Columbus Arts Festival downtown. We'll discuss the 100th anniversary of the Harlem Renaissance and how the 1920s cultural revolution affected Columbus. We'll be joined by leaders of local arts organizations, as well as by one of the performers taking part in both the festival and Columbus's Harlem Rennaisance anniversary project.