guns

In this Jan. 16, 2013 file photo, an assortment of firearms are seen for sale at Capitol City Arms Supply in Springfield, Ill.
Elaine Thompson / Associated Press

After two mass shootings in Dayton and El Paso, Texas, the public conversation has turned once again to guns – and what legislators can do to reduce gun violence.

Republican Congressman Mike Turner is backing restrictions on sales of military style weapons in the wake of the deadly mass shooting in Dayton. 

He'll also support magazine capacity limits and red flag laws that bar potentially dangerous individuals from owning guns.

Gov. Mike DeWine unveils 17-point plan to reduce gun violence.
Ohio Governor Office

Gov. Mike DeWine is calling for a version of the "Red Flag Law," expanded background checks, and other gun control proposals in the wake of the mass shooting in Dayton that left nine people dead. These proposals represent a dramatic shift in the way Ohio's state leadership has handled gun policies for most of the decade.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is ignoring Democrats' efforts to pressure him into calling the Senate back from recess to vote on gun legislation to expand background checks following back to back mass shootings.

But there is movement among some Republican lawmakers, who are calling for action on some gun control measures.

The National Rifle Association's sway in the nation's capital may be waning at a time when two mass shootings in Ohio and Texas are reigniting the debate about enacting new gun restrictions.

In the past few months, the gun rights group's president stepped aside; its top lobbyist resigned; and allegations of financial misconduct at the highest levels of the group have burst into the open.

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine, left, speaks alongside Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley, right, during a vigil at the scene of a mass shooting, Sunday, Aug. 4, 2019, in Dayton.
John Minchillo / AP

Facing pressure to take action after the nation’s latest mass shooting, Gov. Mike DeWine urged Ohio’s GOP-led state legislature Tuesday to pass laws requiring background checks for nearly all gun sales and allowing courts to restrict firearms access for people perceived as threats.

In the wake of the mass shooting in Dayton, Ohioans for Gun Safety says now is the time for state lawmakers to expand and strengthen background checks for gun purchases. 

In May, when 14 tornadoes ripped through Dayton, Ohio, and its suburbs, there was no force on Earth that could stop the destruction.

Tornadoes can't be legislated out of existence.

Mourners gather for a vigil at the scene of a mass shooting, Sunday, Aug. 4, 2019, in Dayton, Ohio.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

When Gov. Mike DeWine spoke to a vigil in Dayton on Sunday night, he was met with chants of “Do something.” He's expected to speak about what might be done on the subject of guns at a press conference Tuesday.

Weapons for sale at Mad River Armory and Range in Springfield.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

Local firearm store owners predict gun, ammunition and magazine sales likely won’t spike in Central Ohio following this weekend's mass shooting in Dayton.

Updated at 5:01 p.m. ET

President Trump, responding Monday to the deadly weekend shootings in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio, that killed 31 people, condemned white supremacy and called for the death penalty for mass murderers and domestic terrorists.

Speaking at the White House, Trump said the nation is "overcome with shock, horror and sorrow."

It took about 30 seconds to bring down the gunman who killed nine people and injured 27 others in a crowded section of downtown Dayton, Ohio, early on Sunday morning — just hours after another scene of violence in the Texas city of El Paso.

Updated Sunday at 11 a.m. ET

Twenty people are dead and 26 wounded after a mass shooting at an El Paso, Texas, Walmart on Saturday morning, according to state and local authorities.

Speaking at a news conference, Gov. Greg Abbott said that what should have been a leisurely day of shopping "turned into one of the most deadly days in the history of Texas."

"We pray that God will be with those who've been harmed in any way," he added.

In this Oct. 4, 2017 file photo, a bump stock is attached to a semi-automatic rifle at the Gun Vault store and shooting range in South Jordan, Utah.
Rick Bowmer / Associated Press

Columbus leaders are celebrating an appeals court ruling that throws out a lawsuit against the city’s ban on bump stocks.

WorldSpectrum / Pixabay

Earlier this year, police dispatchers in Evansville, Ind., received a chilling call. A man said he was holding his wife at knifepoint, and he warned police that he was heavily armed.

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