guns

How you are judged as an elected official has much more to do with how you respond in the worst of times than in the best of times.

Ohio's Republican governor, veteran politician Mike DeWine, is finding that out right now.

A pedestrian passes a makeshift memorial for the slain and injured victims of a mass shooting that occurred in the Oregon District in Dayton, Ohio.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Investigators are split on whether the Dayton shooter intentionally killed his sibling, who was one of the first people he killed, the city's police chief said Tuesday.

Updated at 1:57 p.m. ET

On the presidential campaign trail in Iowa and on the op-ed page of The New York Times, former Vice President Joe Biden has made the case for going back to a nationwide ban on assault weapons and making it "even stronger."

Some have reacted with quizzical expressions: "Back?" "Stronger?"

Weapons for sale at Mad River Armory and Range in Springfield.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

The group pushing for expanded background checks on gun sales says the tragic mass shooting in Dayton has galvanized the state and petitioners say it's time for Ohio lawmakers to take this issue of closing the so-called "Gun Show Loophole" seriously.

Red Flag Gun Laws In The U.S.

Aug 13, 2019
Michael Saechang / Flickr

In the wake of the mass shootings in Dayton and El Paso, Texas, President Trump last week shared a litany of proposals, including the so-called “red flag” approach to gun control. 

Seventeen states and the District of Columbia have already implemented such laws, which allow police to confiscate guns from people at risk of violence. Governor Mike DeWine has proposed his own version of a red flag law for the Buckeye State.

Today on All Sides, red flag laws, how they work and how one might work in Ohio.

This undated photo provided by the Dayton Police Department shows Connor Betts. The 24-year-old masked gunman in body armor opened fire early Sunday, Aug. 4, 2019 in Dayton's Oregon District.
Dayton Police Department

A friend of the Dayton gunman who killed nine people told federal agents he bought him body armor, a gun accessory and a 100-round magazine earlier this year, according to a court document unsealed Monday.

Chris Dorr gestures during an 80 minute video on the Facebook page of the group he leads, Ohio Gun Owners.
Ohio Gun Owners / Facebook

The Ohio Highway Patrol is reviewing comments made by a leader of a pro-gun rights group following the unveiling of a package of gun control proposals by Gov. Mike DeWine.

Updated at 3:37 p.m. ET

After a mass shooting at a Walmart in El Paso, Texas, that left 22 people dead, the company said it would remove from its stores all signs, displays or videos that depict violence in an internal memo.

Gun regulation advocates say they're ready to start working with Gov. Mike DeWine and other lawmakers to pass what they call "common sense" measures.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said the Senate will discuss measures aimed at addressing gun violence in September. He said he expects background checks, assault weapons and "red flag" laws to be part of the debate.

"What we can't do is fail to pass something," McConnell told WHAS radio in Kentucky, adding, "the urgency of this is not lost on any of us."

The gun that was used on Sunday to kill nine people and wound more than a dozen others in Dayton, Ohio, inflicted that damage within just 30 seconds. But while the weapon might look like a rifle to many people, it's technically classified as a pistol under federal law.

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine says he’s moving forward with efforts to tighten gun regulations in the state. 

The Republican appeared in Dayton Thursday with Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley in the Oregon District.

Speaking near the site of a makeshift memorial to the nine people killed, and more than 30 others injured in Sunday’s shooting outside Ned Peppers Bar, Whaley told reporters she's focusing on helping her grieving city heal, and assisting Oregon District shop owners return to business as usual.  

Dayton Mayor Joins Letter Urging U.S. Senate To Return For Gun Bill Vote

Aug 8, 2019
Dayton, Ohio, Mayor Nan Whaley speaks to members of the media Tuesday, Aug. 6, 2019, outside Ned Peppers bar in the Oregon District after a mass shooting that occurred early Sunday morning in Dayton
John Minchillo / Associated Press

More than 200 mayors, including two anguished by mass shootings in Texas and Ohio, are urging the Senate to return to the Capitol to act on gun safety legislation amid criticism that Congress is failing to respond to back-to-back shootings that left 31 people dead.

The nation's foremost public health agency shies away from discussing the important link in this country between suicide and access to guns.

That's according to documents obtained by NPR that suggest the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention instead relies on vague language and messages about suicide that effectively downplay and obscure the risk posed by firearms.

Guns in the United States kill more people through suicide than homicide.

Gov. Mike DeWine (R-Ohio) has said he wants input from gun rights advocates as he works on his plan to reduce gun violence, but some of Ohio's largest groups seem to be split on his proposal.

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