guns

A Ride or Die gun trainer instructs a student on how to safely use her gun.
Ambriehl Crutchfield / WVXU

For some, after Donald Trump was elected president, conversations about race became even more intense.

Tensions heightened so much, one 15-year-old African American boy cried and began to question the safety of his Ohio family. Single mother Tiffany Ware reassured her son she would make sure they were safe.

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine, left, speaks alongside Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley, right, during a vigil at the scene of a mass shooting, Sunday, Aug. 4, 2019, in Dayton.
John Minchillo / AP

In this week's episode of Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU, hosts Mike Thompson and Steve Brown discuss what's been going on at the Statehouse while so many eyes are focused on impeachment.

Guns: when and how to regulate them. It's one of the biggest issues across the country. But the U.S. Supreme Court has rarely weighed in on the issue. In modern times, it has ruled decisively just twice. Now it's on the brink of doing so again.

With the retirement of Justice Anthony Kennedy, there now are five conservative justices who may be willing to shut down many attempts at regulation, just as the NRA's lock on state legislatures may be waning.

In this Oct. 4, 2017 file photo, a bump stock is attached to a semi-automatic rifle at the Gun Vault store and shooting range in South Jordan, Utah.
Rick Bowmer / Associated Press

A divided Ohio Supreme Court has accepted an appeal by Columbus to keep its ban on bump stocks, an accessory that allows semi-automatic weapons to fire rapidly.

Lawmakers are preparing to hold more hearings on a bill that makes it easier to use lethal force as self-defense in a threatening situation, but Gov. Mike DeWine is calling on the legislature to prioritize another bill before "Stand Your Ground."

guns on display in a gun store
Seth Perlman / Associated Press

State lawmakers are considering a bill that would remove what's known as the "duty to retreat" in public before shooting someone in self-defense, a law commonly referred to as the "Stand Your Ground" bill.

A 24-year-old man accused of helping the Dayton mass shooter has pleaded guilty to illegally possessing firearms and lying on a federal firearms form.

Ethan Kollie from Kettering appeared Wednesday in Dayton Federal court.

As part of his guilty plea Kollie acknowledged lying on a United States Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives Form 4473 when purchasing a micro Draco pistol. He denied using illegal drugs when authorities say Kollie used marijuana and psychedelic mushrooms, an admission that would have prevented the sale from going through.

Crowds packed a memorial service for slain Dayton Police Detective Jorge Del Rio on Tuesday, Nov. 11.
WYSO

Federal law enforcement officials have charged a Butler County man with illegally buying the gun used in the shootout that left Dayton Police detective Jorge Del Rio dead.

Updated at 12:30 p.m. ET

The Supreme Court has denied Remington Arms Co.'s bid to block a lawsuit filed by families of victims of the Sandy Hook school massacre. The families say Remington should be held liable, as the maker and promoter of the AR-15-style rifle used in the 2012 killings.

The group Ohioans for Gun Safety is making a push to get a popular gun control measure in front of voters.

According to the group’s spokesman Dennis Willard, they’re focused on one issue: getting mandatory universal background checks passed in Ohio.

Volunteers for the group spent Election Day at polling sites statewide, asking for signatures to put a new gun control law on the 2020 ballot.

Sen. Matt Dolan (R-Chagrin Falls) testifies for S.B. 221, the STRONG Ohio gun violence plan.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

Democratic state senators had lots of questions for the sponsor of Gov. Mike DeWine’s proposed gun violence bill at its first hearing.

Gov. Mike DeWine unveiled his STRONG Ohio plan in front of law enforcement, mental health professionals and state officials in October.
Daniel Konik / Ohio Public Radio

A quarter of the Ohio House,  all Republicans, have signed on to a new “Stand Your Ground” self-defense bill introduced last week.

Several state and local elected officials Friday launched a new yard-sign campaign advocating for stronger Ohio gun laws.

Joining Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley at a press conference in Dayton’s Oregon District were Montgomery County Auditor Karl Keith, State Sen. Peggy Lehner and representatives from the advocacy group Ohioans for Gun Safety.

Whaley announced the “Do Something” campaign outside the Trolley Stop tavern on Fifth St.

guns on display in a gun store
Seth Perlman / Associated Press

A conservative Ohio lawmaker has reintroduced the "Stand Your Ground" self-defense bill. A similar bill was introduced last year, after a veto fight with former Gov. John Kasich resulted in a stripped-down version that eventually passed.

Ohio Supreme Court chambers.
Dan Konik / Ohio Public Radio

The home rule provision was added to the Ohio constitution by voters in 1912, and the struggles between local officials and state lawmakers have raged almost since then.

Pages