guns

gun in holster
Eric Gay / Associated Press

Does carrying a gun make a teacher a security officer, or just a teacher who happens to be carrying a gun? Ohio Supreme Court justices on Tuesday focused on that singular question in hearing arguments for and against arming school staff.

About 75 people wearing masks and carrying signs protest outside the Ohio Statehouse on Thursday, April 9, 2020, in Columbus, Ohio.
Karen Kasler / Statehouse News Bureau

The Republican representative who proposed Ohio's "Stand Your Ground" law says he’s concerned about an armed march planned for the Statehouse this weekend.

Mourners gather for a vigil at the scene of a mass shooting, Sunday, Aug. 4, 2019, in Dayton, Ohio.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

"Arm The Populace" founder and lead firearms trainer Douglas Cooper is a gun guy.

guns on display in a gun store
Seth Perlman / Associated Press

Gov. Mike DeWine’s decision to sign the so-called "Stand Your Ground" gun bill into law isn’t sitting well with some city and state leaders who thought they were making headway in their fight against gun violence.

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine, left, speaks alongside Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley, right, during a vigil at the scene of a mass shooting, Sunday, Aug. 4, 2019, in Dayton.
John Minchillo / AP

Gov. Mike DeWine on Monday signed a "Stand Your Ground" bill into law, backing off his threat to veto after Ohio lawmakers declined to pass gun control proposals.

New Ohio House Speaker Rep. Bob Cupp (R-Lima) speaks during an announcement of a proposed overhaul school funding for schools in Ohio at the Statehouse in Columbus, March 25, 2019.
John Minchillo / AP

The pandemic slowed down work at the Ohio Statehouse in 2020. But lawmakers did pass a number of bills relating to COVID-19, as well as others that dealt with controversial issues like guns and abortion.

In this Jan. 16, 2013 file photo, an assortment of firearms are seen for sale at Capitol City Arms Supply in Springfield, Ill.
Elaine Thompson / Associated Press

As Ohio lawmakers return for a final week of their lame duck session, Gov. Mike DeWine is hinting he’ll veto a controversial gun bill they sent to him last week. If he does reject the so-called "Stand Your Ground" bill, lawmakers may not be able to do anything about it.

guns on display in a gun store
Seth Perlman / Associated Press

A controversial gun law that removes the "duty to retreat" requirement before a person can use lethal force in self-defense was passed by the Ohio Senate, less than a day after the changes were added by the Ohio House.

Dayton, Ohio, Mayor Nan Whaley speaks to members of the media Tuesday, Aug. 6, 2019, outside Ned Peppers bar in the Oregon District after a mass shooting that occurred early Sunday morning in Dayton
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley wants Ohio lawmakers to shelve a bill that would remove restrictions for using lethal force in self-defense. The so-called "Stand Your Ground" bill, SB383, is moving its way through the legislature with the chance of passing before the month's end.

Casey Goodson Jr. was killed by a Franklin County Sheriff's Deputy last Friday.
Walton + Brown

A column published by one of Ohio's most powerful gun rights organizations says Second Amendment supporters should demand answers about the shooting death of a Black man in Columbus.

In this Jan. 16, 2013 file photo, an assortment of firearms are seen for sale at Capitol City Arms Supply in Springfield, Ill.
Elaine Thompson / Associated Press

Gov. Mike DeWine is calling on his fellow Republicans in the Ohio General Assembly to pass what he sees as "common sense" gun regulations. But lawmakers, who have so far ignored DeWine's proposals, have even less time to act as the clock winds down on the current legislative session.

guns on display in a gun store
Seth Perlman / Associated Press

Republican lawmakers in the Ohio House are weighing a proposal to further expand Ohio's gun laws, including allowing guns in more places and increasing "Stand Your Ground" provisions.

Mourners gather for a vigil at the scene of a mass shooting, Sunday, Aug. 4, 2019, in Dayton, Ohio.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

The cities of Columbus and Dayton, along with the national gun control group Everytown and Ohio resident Meghan Volk, are suing the Ohio Attorney General's Office over the state’s gun background check system. The lawsuit targets a problem in Ohio that’s been known for years.

Weapons for sale at Mad River Armory and Range in Springfield.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

The cities of Columbus and Dayton are suing Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost's office over what they call a failure to update the criminal background check system used to investigate potential gun owners.

When Ohio Governor Mike DeWine responded to calls to "do something" after Dayton's Oregon District mass shooting, one thing he thought about was creating a more comprehensive background check system for people buying guns. The state is now preparing to start a pilot program with a complete rollout in 2022.

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