gun control

The House is slated to vote Wednesday on a bill that would require background checks on all gun sales — including those that occur online or at gun shows. On Monday, a group of four CEOs sent a letter urging Congress to pass the proposal.

Ohio Gun Groups Say Self-Defense Bill Bans Some Weapons

Feb 18, 2019
Lisa Marie Pane / AP

A mistake in writing up an Ohio bill could inadvertently ban several types of already legal guns and must be fixed quickly, gun rights advocates say.

One year after the school shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., the urgency for new gun restrictions has declined, but roughly half the country is concerned a mass shooting could happen at a school in their community, a new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll finds.

In the immediate aftermath of the mass shooting that killed 17 people on Valentine's Day, 71 percent of Americans said laws covering the sale of firearms should be stricter. Now, it's 51 percent.

There will be no marching.

There will be no school walkouts.

Only a day of reflection and service and, perhaps most consequential, a time to grieve.

That is how many of the Parkland, Fla., survivors turned activists plan to spend Thursday, the first anniversary of the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School.

There's a countdown clock on the website for RW Arms, a Texas-based seller of firearms accessories. It tracks the days, hours, minutes and seconds until they're no longer permitted to sell bump stocks, devices that allow semi-automatic rifles to fire almost as fast as illegal machine guns.

Promotional emails from RW Arms also include the countdown clock, urging customers to "order now" to "enjoy this unique firing experience" while they can.

Updated at 6:29 p.m. ET

The new House Democratic majority is promising to do something the party avoided when it last controlled the levers of power in Washington: pass gun legislation enhancing background check requirements for all gun purchases.

Ohio Gov. John Kasich
Charles Krupa / Associated Press

Over the years, Kasich's tone has changed dramatically, as he’s worked to accomplish his goals and create a national persona as a Trump critic and a promoter of bipartisan compromise.

Lisa Marie Pane / AP

Ohio Senate president Larry Obhof (R-Medina) said he's open to discussing two high-profile gun laws when the General Assembly returns next year: the "Stand Your Ground" bill and the "red flag law."

In this Jan. 16, 2013 file photo, an assortment of firearms are seen for sale at Capitol City Arms Supply in Springfield, Ill.
Elaine Thompson / Associated Press

This was the year Ohio saw a dramatic tone shift when it comes to gun policies – at least when it came to Gov. John Kasich.

Damian Dovarganes / Associated Press

The Ohio General Assembly has voted to override Gov. John Kasich’s veto on, HB 228, a bill that would revamp the way the state handles self-defense cases in court.

The stage is set for one last battle between lawmakers and Gov. John Kasich after he vetoed three bills in the past month. The House says it plans to take at least one veto override vote, which could include the self-defense gun bill.

Gun control advocates view 2018 as a turning point in their campaign to strengthen the country's gun laws.

They cite widespread success in passing laws through state legislatures. They're also buoyed by Democratic victories in the midterm elections, which flipped control of the House of Representatives. Another benchmark: In this election cycle, gun control groups outspent gun rights groups for the first time ever.

When we set out to try to look back on the year that was in politics, we started with a list that grew ... and grew ... and grew. After a couple of days, the list was just shy of 100 news events. That's about one notable story every three days.

Gov. Kasich Vetoes Self-Defense Gun Bill

Dec 20, 2018
Ohio Governor John Kasich
Carolyn Kaster / Associated Press

Gov. John Kasich has vetoed a pro-gun bill, HB 228, that would have changed the way self-defense cases play out in court, shifting the burden from the defense to the prosecution.

In this Oct. 4, 2017 file photo, a bump stock is attached to a semi-automatic rifle at the Gun Vault store and shooting range in South Jordan, Utah.
Rick Bowmer / Associated Press

The U.S. Department of Justice on Tuesday announced a final rule banning the gun accessories known as “bump stocks,” a move that may impact a Columbus lawsuit.

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