gun control

Weapons for sale at Mad River Armory and Range in Springfield.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

Ohio lawmakers are considering a long-debated bill that would roll back concealed-carry gun permit and training regulations. Some states have already passed similar controversial laws, while others have gone in the opposite direction to tighten gun sale, permit and background-check rules.

Updated at 12:49 p.m. ET

The House of Representatives approved legislation renewing the Violence Against Women Act with new provisions that restrict gun ownership and expand transgender rights.

The National Rifle Association opposed the bill — putting GOP lawmakers in a tough position of voting against a measure protecting victims of domestic and sexual violence or opposing the politically powerful gun lobby.

The vote was 263 to 158, with 33 Republicans joining all but one Democrat to pass the measure. One GOP member voted present.

John Minchillo / Associated Press

In this week's episode of Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU, Steve Brown and Mike Thompson discuss what a recent poll says about the minds of Ohio voters.  Lauren Copeland, associate director of Baldwin Wallace University's Community Research Institute, joins the show.

Updated at 2:55 p.m. ET

The U.S. Supreme Court officially denied an appeal from gun rights advocates seeking to stop a Trump administration ban on bump stocks, the gun add-ons that can dramatically increase their rate of fire. The ban went into effect on Tuesday.

Bump stocks — the gun add-ons that can dramatically increase their rate of fire — are now officially illegal in the U.S., after a Trump administration ban took effect Tuesday. Anyone selling or owning bump stocks could face up to 10 years in federal prison and a fine of $250,000 for each violation.

Chief Justice John Roberts declined to hear an appeal from gun makers on the new ban Tuesday, allowing it to remain in place. A separate appeal that seeks a stay on enforcing the ban is before Justice Sonia Sotomayor.

Updated at 4:28 p.m. ET

Days after three separate suicides in Parkland, Fla., and Newtown, Conn., left those communities reeling, the Senate did something rare for a GOP-led chamber: It held a hearing on gun control.

Open Carry advocate Jeffry Smith at a 2016 protest on Ohio State's campus.
Esther Honig / WOSU

The Ohio State University will now allow students, faculty and staff with concealed carry permits to store  guns on campus.

Ohio Senate President Larry Obhof
Ohio Senate

The president of the Ohio Senate doesn’t think lawmakers infringed on cities’ rights with legislation that supersedes local gun ordinances and gives citizens the right to challenge those local laws in court.

City Attorney Zach Klein
Nick Evans / WOSU

Columbus City Attorney Zach Klein is suing the state over a series of changes to Ohio’s gun laws passed during the waning days of former Gov. Jon Kasich’s administration. In briefs filed Tuesday, Klein argues the new law violates home rule and separation of power provisions in the state constitution.

New Zealand's cabinet has agreed "in principle" to tighten gun control laws, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said Monday, promising the changes will make the country safer. "We've unified, there are simply details to work through," she said.

After months of silence, the Connecticut Supreme Court on Thursday reinstated a wrongful death lawsuit filed by the families of nine victims of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting against Remington Arms, the manufacturer of the rifle used in the shooting.

In this Jan. 16, 2013 file photo, an assortment of firearms are seen for sale at Capitol City Arms Supply in Springfield, Ill.
Elaine Thompson / Associated Press

For his first bill as governor, Mike DeWine signed a measure that corrects what lawmakers believed to be an oversight in last year’s self-defense gun bill. An oversight that could’ve resulted in banning shotguns and rifles, such as AR-15’s.

State Lawmakers Fix Error That Could Ban Some Guns

Mar 7, 2019
In this Jan. 16, 2013 file photo, an assortment of firearms are seen for sale at Capitol City Arms Supply in Springfield, Ill.
Elaine Thompson / Associated Press

State lawmakers have fixed a mistake in an Ohio bill that gun rights advocates said could inadvertently ban several types of legal guns and have sent the corrective bill to the governor for his signature.

Dave Yost speaks at the Ohio Republican Party event, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2018, in Columbus, Ohio. Yost was elected as the next Ohio attorney general.
Tony Dejak / Associated Press

The state has joined two briefings filed with the U.S. Supreme Court on cases dealing with gun ownership and regulations. Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost says one of the legal fights is about protecting the country from setting a dangerous precedent related to constitutional rights.

Updated at 6:35 p.m. ET

The House passed what advocates call the most significant gun control measure in more than two decades on Wednesday when it approved the first of two bills aimed at broadening the federal background check system for firearms purchases.

The vote on the first bill, dubbed the Bipartisan Background Checks Act of 2019, passed largely along party lines 240 to 190 with Democrats who control the House cheering as they carried the legislation across the finish line.

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