gun control

The National Rifle Association's sway in the nation's capital may be waning at a time when two mass shootings in Ohio and Texas are reigniting the debate about enacting new gun restrictions.

In the past few months, the gun rights group's president stepped aside; its top lobbyist resigned; and allegations of financial misconduct at the highest levels of the group have burst into the open.

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine, left, speaks alongside Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley, right, during a vigil at the scene of a mass shooting, Sunday, Aug. 4, 2019, in Dayton.
John Minchillo / AP

Facing pressure to take action after the nation’s latest mass shooting, Gov. Mike DeWine urged Ohio’s GOP-led state legislature Tuesday to pass laws requiring background checks for nearly all gun sales and allowing courts to restrict firearms access for people perceived as threats.

In May, when 14 tornadoes ripped through Dayton, Ohio, and its suburbs, there was no force on Earth that could stop the destruction.

Tornadoes can't be legislated out of existence.

Mourners gather for a vigil at the scene of a mass shooting, Sunday, Aug. 4, 2019, in Dayton, Ohio.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

When Gov. Mike DeWine spoke to a vigil in Dayton on Sunday night, he was met with chants of “Do something.” He's expected to speak about what might be done on the subject of guns at a press conference Tuesday.

Weapons for sale at Mad River Armory and Range in Springfield.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

Local firearm store owners predict gun, ammunition and magazine sales likely won’t spike in Central Ohio following this weekend's mass shooting in Dayton.

Updated at 9:15 p.m. ET

As national and local leaders grapple with the nation's raw emotions over the mass shootings in El Paso and Dayton, the mayor of El Paso, Dee Margo, confirmed that President Trump will visit his city on Wednesday.

Updated at 5:01 p.m. ET

President Trump, responding Monday to the deadly weekend shootings in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio, that killed 31 people, condemned white supremacy and called for the death penalty for mass murderers and domestic terrorists.

Speaking at the White House, Trump said the nation is "overcome with shock, horror and sorrow."

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine, left, speaks alongside Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley, right, during a vigil at the scene of a mass shooting, Sunday, Aug. 4, 2019, in Dayton.
John Minchillo / AP

Government leaders from around the state extended their condolences to the families and friends who lost loved ones during the mass shooting in Dayton, while some top leaders called for legislation to prevent such an attack in the future.

In this Oct. 4, 2017 file photo, a bump stock is attached to a semi-automatic rifle at the Gun Vault store and shooting range in South Jordan, Utah.
Rick Bowmer / Associated Press

Columbus leaders are celebrating an appeals court ruling that throws out a lawsuit against the city’s ban on bump stocks.

WorldSpectrum / Pixabay

Earlier this year, police dispatchers in Evansville, Ind., received a chilling call. A man said he was holding his wife at knifepoint, and he warned police that he was heavily armed.

Abortion supporters gather outside the Ohio Statehouse on Tuesday to rally against the anti-abortion laws in the state.
Sam Aberle / Ohio Public Radio

A new Quinnipiac University poll shows a majority of Ohioans support background checks for gun sales, favor legalized abortion and oppose the recently-passed “Heartbeat Bill.” 

A gun safety group has resubmitted petition language that would call for the Ohio General Assembly to pass a bill that would expand background checks for guns purchased online and at gun shows.

A gun safety group that wants to convince Ohio lawmakers to require background checks on nearly all gun sales is not giving up on its effort, though Attorney General Dave Yost rejected its first attempt. 

In this Jan. 16, 2013 file photo, an assortment of firearms are seen for sale at Capitol City Arms Supply in Springfield, Ill.
Elaine Thompson / Associated Press

Gun rights advocates say a proposal to require nearly all gun sales and transfers to go through federally licensed dealers and to require buyers to undergo background checks won’t have much of an effect on crime.

House and Senate Democrats introduced legislation Tuesday they say will allow victims of gun violence to have their day in court.

The Equal Access to Justice for Victims of Gun Violence Act aims to repeal federal protections blocking firearm and ammunition manufacturers, dealers and trade groups from most civil lawsuits when a firearm is used unlawfully or in a crime.

Those protections date to 2005, with the passage of the Protection of Lawful Commerce in Arms Act.

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