gun control

Gov. Mike DeWine unveils 17-point plan to reduce gun violence.
Ohio Governor Office

In this week's episode of Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU, hosts Mike Thompson and Steve Brown discuss the ongoing debate over the governor's proposed gun regulations. Dean Rieck, executive director of the Buckeye Firearms Association, joins the show. 

After back-to-back mass shootings, residents in one Houston suburb are demanding members of Congress finally take action to stop a deadly trend in America.

Fort Bend County is home to Sugar Land and other cities where demographics and political stripes are dramatically changing. And voters in the 22nd congressional district who have elected Republicans opposed to major gun restrictions in recent years may be considering giving a Democrat the job in 2020.

A no firearms sign in Tempe, Arizona.
Cory Doctorow / Flickr

As part of WOSU's Curious Cbus project, we asked our audience to submit their questions about guns in Ohio. Pretty quickly a theme emerged: Many listeners wanted to know where you can—and can’t—legally carry a firearm. 

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine and former Ohio Gov. John Kasich
AP

One of Gov. Mike DeWine’s proposed gun law changes in the wake of the Dayton shooting is an idea that’s been talked about before and passed in 17 other states. The bill more commonly known as a "red flag law" would provide a way to remove guns from people who are thought to be dangerous to themselves or others.

How you are judged as an elected official has much more to do with how you respond in the worst of times than in the best of times.

Ohio's Republican governor, veteran politician Mike DeWine, is finding that out right now.

Updated at 1:57 p.m. ET

On the presidential campaign trail in Iowa and on the op-ed page of The New York Times, former Vice President Joe Biden has made the case for going back to a nationwide ban on assault weapons and making it "even stronger."

Some have reacted with quizzical expressions: "Back?" "Stronger?"

Chris Dorr gestures during an 80 minute video on the Facebook page of the group he leads, Ohio Gun Owners.
Ohio Gun Owners / Facebook

The Ohio Highway Patrol is reviewing comments made by a leader of a pro-gun rights group following the unveiling of a package of gun control proposals by Gov. Mike DeWine.

State senators are reintroducing a "Red Flag" bill with the support of Sen. Peggy Lehner (R-Kettering) who says she's no longer satisfied with the status quo.

Updated at 11:58 a.m. ET

President Trump on Friday indicated that he supported new legislation on "intelligent" background checks for gun purchases after recent mass shootings in Texas and Ohio.

"On background checks, we have tremendous support for really common-sense, sensible, important background checks," Trump told reporters at the White House.

The president said the issue "isn't a question of NRA, Republican or Democrat," and added that he had spoken with the head of the National Rifle Association.

Gun regulation advocates say they're ready to start working with Gov. Mike DeWine and other lawmakers to pass what they call "common sense" measures.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said the Senate will discuss measures aimed at addressing gun violence in September. He said he expects background checks, assault weapons and "red flag" laws to be part of the debate.

"What we can't do is fail to pass something," McConnell told WHAS radio in Kentucky, adding, "the urgency of this is not lost on any of us."

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine says he’s moving forward with efforts to tighten gun regulations in the state. 

The Republican appeared in Dayton Thursday with Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley in the Oregon District.

Speaking near the site of a makeshift memorial to the nine people killed, and more than 30 others injured in Sunday’s shooting outside Ned Peppers Bar, Whaley told reporters she's focusing on helping her grieving city heal, and assisting Oregon District shop owners return to business as usual.  

Dayton Mayor Joins Letter Urging U.S. Senate To Return For Gun Bill Vote

Aug 8, 2019
Dayton, Ohio, Mayor Nan Whaley speaks to members of the media Tuesday, Aug. 6, 2019, outside Ned Peppers bar in the Oregon District after a mass shooting that occurred early Sunday morning in Dayton
John Minchillo / Associated Press

More than 200 mayors, including two anguished by mass shootings in Texas and Ohio, are urging the Senate to return to the Capitol to act on gun safety legislation amid criticism that Congress is failing to respond to back-to-back shootings that left 31 people dead.

Mourners gather for a vigil at the scene of a mass shooting, Sunday, Aug. 4, 2019, in Dayton, Ohio.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

In this week's episode of Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU, hosts Mike Thompson and Steve Brown discuss how recent mass shooting have pushed some lawmakers to propose new gun legislation. Ohioans for Gun Safety spokesperson Dennis Willard joins the show.

Updated at 7:15 p.m. ET

President Trump visited survivors of the shooting in Dayton, Ohio, on Wednesday before heading to El Paso, Texas, the site of the weekend's other deadly violence. Trump remained out of public view during the Dayton stop.

On the ground in El Paso, Trump said, "We had an amazing day."

"The love, the respect, for the office of the presidency, it was — I wish you could have been in there to see it," he told reporters.

Pages