gun control

Lawmakers are back on Capitol Hill on Monday after an extended summer recess with a short window to tackle major legislative priorities before the 2020 presidential campaign takes center stage.

There’s certainly an ongoing and uncivil war between many Republicans and Democrats. But two former Ohio governors have called a truce, and created a friendship.

Gov. Mike DeWine unveils 17-point plan to reduce gun violence.
Ohio Governor Office

Gov. Mike DeWine on Wednesday announced plans to enhance background checks for gun purchases, the latest step in his administration’s plan to reduce gun violence.

J. Scott Applewhite / Associated Press

Gov. Mike DeWine has rolled out a 17 point plan to address gun violence in the wake of a mass shooting in Dayton. Legislative leaders are already warning proposals like new background checks and a so-called "red flag law" could be a tough sell with their members.

As part of our Curious Cbus series about guns in Ohio, several listeners wanted to know how much the NRA—and other gun groups—donate to Ohio lawmakers.

President Trump said he is willing to get behind some changes to background checks for gun buyers as long as Democrats don't move the goalposts and lead him down a "slippery slope."

The president told reporters on Wednesday that he continues to support new or altered checks, without going into detail, and he acknowledged that he has been taking counsel on the issue from the National Rifle Association.

Updated at 2:15 p.m. ET

With their hopes fading that lawmakers in Washington will pass new gun safety measures, young activists from March for Our Lives have their own plans on how to stem gun violence.

The last thing that Nan Whaley, the Democratic mayor of Dayton, wants to hear in the wake of the tragedy that rocked her city on the early morning of Aug. 4 is the usual partisan bickering and excuses by politicians who are in the pocket of special interests.

She doesn't want to hear it.

Strong majorities of Americans from across the political spectrum support laws that allow family members or law enforcement to petition a judge to temporarily remove guns from a person who is seen to be a risk to themselves or others, according to a new APM Research Lab/Guns & America/Call To Mind survey.

Paige Pfleger / WOSU

William Wood answers the door to his suburban Columbus home with a Glock 19 on his hip. His two toddler-aged children, Daisey and Wesley, peak out from behind his legs.  

Gov. Mike DeWine unveils 17-point plan to reduce gun violence.
Ohio Governor Office

In this week's episode of Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU, hosts Mike Thompson and Steve Brown discuss the ongoing debate over the governor's proposed gun regulations. Dean Rieck, executive director of the Buckeye Firearms Association, joins the show. 

After back-to-back mass shootings, residents in one Houston suburb are demanding members of Congress finally take action to stop a deadly trend in America.

Fort Bend County is home to Sugar Land and other cities where demographics and political stripes are dramatically changing. And voters in the 22nd congressional district who have elected Republicans opposed to major gun restrictions in recent years may be considering giving a Democrat the job in 2020.

A no firearms sign in Tempe, Arizona.
Cory Doctorow / Flickr

As part of WOSU's Curious Cbus project, we asked our audience to submit their questions about guns in Ohio. Pretty quickly a theme emerged: Many listeners wanted to know where you can—and can’t—legally carry a firearm. 

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine and former Ohio Gov. John Kasich
AP

One of Gov. Mike DeWine’s proposed gun law changes in the wake of the Dayton shooting is an idea that’s been talked about before and passed in 17 other states. The bill more commonly known as a "red flag law" would provide a way to remove guns from people who are thought to be dangerous to themselves or others.

How you are judged as an elected official has much more to do with how you respond in the worst of times than in the best of times.

Ohio's Republican governor, veteran politician Mike DeWine, is finding that out right now.

Updated at 1:57 p.m. ET

On the presidential campaign trail in Iowa and on the op-ed page of The New York Times, former Vice President Joe Biden has made the case for going back to a nationwide ban on assault weapons and making it "even stronger."

Some have reacted with quizzical expressions: "Back?" "Stronger?"

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