gun control

On Monday, Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine laid out the details of his 17-point plan – the STRONG Ohio plan – to address gun violence in the wake of the Aug. 4 mass shooting in Dayton that left nine dead and dozens wounded.

It is a plan, the Republican governor said, the Ohio legislature – dominated by his fellow Republicans – would vote to approve.

Gun Control In Ohio

Oct 9, 2019

Governor Mike DeWine in August -- and just days after a mass shooting in Dayton -- proposed the outline of a plan for mandatory background checks on private gun sales and a version of the so-called “red flag” law. On Monday, DeWine retreated from both proposals.

Instead, he proposed expanding the state’s “pink slip” system that hospitalizes people who are mentally ill for up to three days. And he proposed a plan to make it easier to prosecute the gun sellers.

Today on All Sides with Ann Fisher: the DeWine plan to address gun violence.

Guests:

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley is reacting to Gov. Mike DeWine’s proposed changes to state gun laws. The governor unveiled details of his so-called STRONG Ohio bill Monday afternoon in Columbus.

Among the bill's proposed changes are voluntary measures allowing private gun buyers and sellers to request proof of background checks. The proposal would also expand the criteria used to keep guns out of the hands of people who pose a danger to themselves or others. 

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine, left, speaks alongside Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley, right, during a vigil at the scene of a mass shooting, Sunday, Aug. 4, 2019, in Dayton.
John Minchillo / AP

Two months after the mass shooting in Dayton spurred Gov. Mike DeWine to take action against gun violence, the governor has released details about the official bill he's presenting to lawmakers. The legislation won't include two significant gun control measures DeWine previously supported, however.

Gov. Mike DeWine plans to reveal on Monday the official bill language on expanded background checks and red-flag gun confiscation, two major issues that have been at the center of heated debate in the aftermath of the Dayton mass shooting. 

The Supreme Court may be eager to portray itself as an apolitical institution. But this term, political questions writ large are knocking at the high court door.

The upcoming term will almost surely be a march to the right on almost every issue that is a flashpoint in American society. Among them: abortion, guns, gay rights, the separation of church and state, immigration and presidential power.

Students at the University of Dayton plan to rally Friday, Oct. 4 in favor of gun reform. Organizers say they coordinated the campus protest to mark the two-month anniversary of Dayton’s deadly August mass shooting that killed nine people and injured another three dozen others.

Student organizer Cierra Stewart says she wants lawmakers to strengthen background checks and tighten firearm-sales regulations.

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine says he expects to share the language of a gun-reform package with state lawmakers within days. The proposal would include measures the governor first discussed in the wake of the August 4 mass shooting in Dayton. 

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley testified on Capitol Hill Wednesday in support of stricter gun controls.

Speaking before a House Judiciary Committee Hearing on Assault Weapons, Whaley called on lawmakers to take assault weapons off the streets to stop shootings similar to the one in the city’s Oregon District that left nine people dead and nearly three dozen others injured.

Beto O'Rourke surrounded by attendees at Tuesday's town hall.
Nick Evans / WOSU

Democratic presidential candidate Beto O’Rourke fielded questions from Ohio State University students Tuesday at a town hall in the Ohio Union. 

House Speaker Larry Householder (R-Glenford) says Gov. Mike DeWine's proposed gun regulations, which include expanded background checks and a version of the "Red Flag Law," will be "well vetted" by the Republican caucus.

Dayton, Ohio, Mayor Nan Whaley speaks to members of the media Tuesday, Aug. 6, 2019, outside Ned Peppers bar in the Oregon District after a mass shooting that occurred early Sunday morning in Dayton
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Leaders of the U.S. Conference of Mayors come to Columbus on Tuesday to lobby the federal government to pass gun control measures.

Ohio lawmakers passed a law in 2006 that prevented local governments from passing any gun laws that are more restrictive than those enacted at the state level, and when cities challenged it, the Ohio Supreme Court upheld the law. Now, there’s a move afoot to change it.

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine, left, speaks alongside Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley, right, during a vigil at the scene of a mass shooting, Sunday, Aug. 4, 2019, in Dayton.
John Minchillo / AP

More than 3,600 people have written letters, emails and made phone calls to Gov. Mike DeWine in the month following the deadly mass shooting in Dayton.

A group of protesters marched in downtown Columbus to voice their support for more gun regulations, especially expanded background checks and the so-called "red flag" gun seizure law. The march comes as lawmakers hold hearings on several gun regulation bills. 

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