gun control

The group that’s hoping to ask voters to expand background checks on gun sales through a potential ballot issue says they're now pushing their initiative by a year. 

A Ride or Die gun trainer instructs a student on how to safely use her gun.
Ambriehl Crutchfield / WVXU

For some, after Donald Trump was elected president, conversations about race became even more intense.

Tensions heightened so much, one 15-year-old African American boy cried and began to question the safety of his Ohio family. Single mother Tiffany Ware reassured her son she would make sure they were safe.

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine, left, speaks alongside Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley, right, during a vigil at the scene of a mass shooting, Sunday, Aug. 4, 2019, in Dayton.
John Minchillo / AP

In this week's episode of Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU, hosts Mike Thompson and Steve Brown discuss what's been going on at the Statehouse while so many eyes are focused on impeachment.

Guns: when and how to regulate them. It's one of the biggest issues across the country. But the U.S. Supreme Court has rarely weighed in on the issue. In modern times, it has ruled decisively just twice. Now it's on the brink of doing so again.

With the retirement of Justice Anthony Kennedy, there now are five conservative justices who may be willing to shut down many attempts at regulation, just as the NRA's lock on state legislatures may be waning.

In this Oct. 4, 2017 file photo, a bump stock is attached to a semi-automatic rifle at the Gun Vault store and shooting range in South Jordan, Utah.
Rick Bowmer / Associated Press

A divided Ohio Supreme Court has accepted an appeal by Columbus to keep its ban on bump stocks, an accessory that allows semi-automatic weapons to fire rapidly.

The group Ohioans for Gun Safety is making a push to get a popular gun control measure in front of voters.

According to the group’s spokesman Dennis Willard, they’re focused on one issue: getting mandatory universal background checks passed in Ohio.

Volunteers for the group spent Election Day at polling sites statewide, asking for signatures to put a new gun control law on the 2020 ballot.

Sen. Matt Dolan (R-Chagrin Falls) testifies for S.B. 221, the STRONG Ohio gun violence plan.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

Democratic state senators had lots of questions for the sponsor of Gov. Mike DeWine’s proposed gun violence bill at its first hearing.

Gov. Mike DeWine unveiled his STRONG Ohio plan in front of law enforcement, mental health professionals and state officials in October.
Daniel Konik / Ohio Public Radio

A quarter of the Ohio House,  all Republicans, have signed on to a new “Stand Your Ground” self-defense bill introduced last week.

Several state and local elected officials Friday launched a new yard-sign campaign advocating for stronger Ohio gun laws.

Joining Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley at a press conference in Dayton’s Oregon District were Montgomery County Auditor Karl Keith, State Sen. Peggy Lehner and representatives from the advocacy group Ohioans for Gun Safety.

Whaley announced the “Do Something” campaign outside the Trolley Stop tavern on Fifth St.

Clare Driscoll helped organize walkouts at Upper Arlington High School.
Nick Evans / WOSU

At lunchtime on a drizzly, February day last year, students at Upper Arlington High School flooded out of the building into a courtyard. Clare Driscoll and Dylan Carlson-Sirvent couldn't believe how many have fellow students showed up for the walkouts to protest gun restrictions.

Damian Dovarganes / Associated Press

Gov. Mike DeWine’s package of proposals to reduce gun violence through mental health and gun policy changes is getting mixed reviews from both Democrats and Republicans.

Weekly Reporter Roundtable

Oct 14, 2019
ohiostatehouse.org

When Gov. Mike DeWine addressed a Dayton crowd two days after a mass shooting in August, the crowd asked him to just "do something." He responded with a proposal for universal background checks on gun sales and a version of the "red flag" law.

The governor last week retreated from both promises, saying that he has a superior plan that would expand the state’s pink slip system, hospitalizing certain people deemed at risk for violence for up to three days, and a way to make it easier to prosecute gun sellers.

Allen Breed / Associated Press

Gov. Mike DeWine’s gun violence plan calls for using Ohio’s “pink slip” process to separate people thought to be dangerous from their guns. However, the Republican leader of the Ohio House says many in the party don’t agree with that approach.

Gov. Mike DeWine unveils 17-point plan to reduce gun violence.
Ohio Governor Office

In this week's episode of Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU, hosts Mike Thompson and Steve Brown talk about Gov. Mike DeWine's proposed gun laws. Depending on who you ask, DeWine's proposals either don't do enough or do too much. Ann Fisher, host of All Sides with Ann Fisher on 89.7 NPR News, joins the show.

Gov. Mike DeWine speaks during a public inauguration ceremony at the Ohio Statehouse, Monday, Jan. 14, 2019, in Columbus, Ohio.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Gov. Mike DeWine continues to defend his "STRONG Ohio" gun legislation proposal, details of which he released Monday.

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