gun control

President Trump's nominee to the Supreme Court says she shares the outlook of her mentor, the late Justice Antonin Scalia. But on the issue of the Second Amendment, Amy Coney Barrett seems to have staked out an even more conservative position.

That's got gun control advocates warning that big changes could be on the way if Barrett gets confirmed.

In 2008, the Supreme Court ruled people have a right to keep handguns at home to defend themselves. Since that time, the high court has mostly avoided taking on new gun cases, refusing to hear 10 such lawsuits in June alone.

The Ohio chapter of the Fraternal Order of Police filed a brief in the state’s highest court Monday arguing against arming teachers, as the policies would “make an already dangerous situation even more dangerous for law enforcement, for school staff, and for the students themselves.”

The Ohio FOP laid out a series of dangers posed by arming teachers without extensive training. First among the points: anyone involved in a gunfight becomes less accurate.

Four years ago, Heather Tuck-Macalla moved back to Bay Village, and although she’s a firm Democrat, she did not put out a yard sign for Hillary Clinton.

“I was afraid of, I don’t know, just ruffling feathers with neighbors,” she said. “And I regret not doing that, because it’s worth ruffling.”

After all, this majority white, economically better off suburb backed George W. Bush twice, narrowly supported John McCain, and gave Mitt Romney a majority. But when the votes were counted in 2016, Clinton came out 10 points ahead of Donald Trump.

guns on display in a gun store
Seth Perlman / Associated Press

A coalition of eight groups advocating for more gun control launched an online petition campaign to stop the “Stand Your Ground” bill under consideration in the Ohio legislature. 

Mourners gather for a vigil at the scene of a mass shooting, Sunday, Aug. 4, 2019, in Dayton, Ohio.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

In this week's episode of Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU, hosts Mike Thompson and Steve Brown discuss why little progress has been made on gun reform legislation proposed by Gov. Mike DeWine.

The anniversary of the mass shooting in Dayton is reviving conversations about gun regulations in Ohio. While lawmakers have refused to move Gov. Mike DeWine's (R-Ohio) gun regulation proposals, his administration is rolling out a program that he says can improve the accuracy of background checks.

guns on display in a gun store
Seth Perlman / Associated Press

A new cross-check system between separate state law enforcement agencies has turned up 41 ineligible holders of Ohio concealed-weapon permits.

Updated: 5:51 p.m., Tuesday, March 31, 2020

An appeals court decision in Butler County Monday throws Ohio's program for arming teachers into doubt.

According to the decision in the lawsuit challenging Madison Township’s armed teacher policies, state law requires a school employee undergo the state’s peace officer training program or have experience working as a police officer to serve in a security role.

Joe Biden at a campaign stop in Columbus, Ohio, on March 10, 2020.
Nick Evans / WOSU

Activists from Moms Demand Action and the Brady Campaign fanned out behind the podium in a small Driving Park gymnasium. Wearing red or purple shirts, many held signs declaring “beat the NRA with Biden."

Voters cast their ballots at the Cincinnati Public Library's polling station, Tuesday, Nov. 5, 2019, in Cincinnati.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Crime, drugs and guns top the list of social issues most concerning to African Americans in Ohio, according to a statewide poll released Wednesday.

Ohio Supreme Court chambers.
Dan Konik / Ohio Public Radio

The Ohio Supreme Court will decide if a state law that says gun owners can’t use their weapons while drunk is constitutional.

John Glenn International Airport

Columbus City Council is considering increasing penalties for people who bring guns into airport security lines. John Glenn International Airport reported an 81% uptick in guns found over the last five years.

Updated at 5:11 p.m. ET

Virginia's Democratic governor seemed poised to make broad changes to his state's gun control laws, but was dealt a stinging blow by his own party Monday when a state Senate committee blocked a bill that would have, among other things, banned sales of assault weapons.

Four Democrats on Virginia's Senate Judiciary Committee broke ranks with their party handing the Republican minority a victory in tabling the bill for the remainder of the year. It also sent the measure to the state's Crime Commission for further review.

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine, left, speaks alongside Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley, right, during a vigil at the scene of a mass shooting, Sunday, Aug. 4, 2019, in Dayton.
John Minchillo / AP

Gov. Mike DeWine says he wants state lawmakers to pass his plan on gun violence by the end of this year.

guns on display in a gun store
Seth Perlman / Associated Press

The leader of the Ohio House had pointed to a bill that would change gun and mental health laws as an alternative to Gov. Mike DeWine’s anti-gun violence package. The proposal that is likely to be opposed by some Republicans.

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