graduation rates

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The Ohio classes of 2019 and 2020 could be allowed the same alternative options for earning a high school diploma as this year’s seniors.

The Ohio Board of Education voted 16-1 Tuesday to allow students to graduate by pursuing alternative pathways, like completing a senior project or obtaining an industry credential.

Stateboard of Education
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The Ohio Board of Education is recommending lawmakers reduce the number of exams students must take to graduate.

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Ohio education officials said last week that the potential for a high school graduation crisis for the class of 2018 was easing because of an alternative path to graduation approved by state lawmakers.

But state school board members say the numbers for 2019 are still cause for concern.

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More than three-quarters of Ohio high school seniors are on track to graduate in May, with another 19 percent “highly likely” to meet requirements to receive their diplomas.

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Overall, the high school graduation rate in Ohio is climbing, but changes to federal education policies could cause a decrease this school year.

Ohio State University

State officials have been working to ease what they call a looming crisis of Ohio having too few college graduates. An update on that goal shows there's still a lot of work left to be done.

Jibril Mohamed

On Friday night, hundreds of Somali American high school and college graduates will celebrate their academic achievements during the annual Ohio Somali graduation. Eight years after the first ceremony, the number of young Somalis donning caps and gowns has increased dramatically.

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Next year’s graduating high school senior must get a good score over seven different final tests or on a college entrance exam, or earn an industry credential.

As many as 47,000 high school juniors are potentially on track to fail to meet those standards. An amendment that may be attached to the budget in the Senate seeks to help those students.

School bus
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An annual study co-authored by Johns Hopkins University says the U.S. high school graduation rate is at an all-time high: 83.2 percent. But the report released Wednesday finds that Ohio’s graduation rate has stalled.

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Ohio’s high school juniors may head into their summer break uncertain about what they need to do to earn a high school diploma. At the moment, they must reach a certain score on seven end of course tests. But that is likely to change.

High schools around the state are facing a crucial dilemma as about a third of students are not on track to graduate. That’s based on the new graduation standards that begin with the class of 2018. Now leaders are moving quickly to find a way to remedy the approaching crisis.

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The Class of 2018 in Ohio’s high schools will be the first to choose their route to graduation – pass some state tests, take a college entrance exam or earn an industry credential.

But new numbers show as much as a third of those students won’t be able to get their diplomas when those new graduation standards take effect next year. That has the state’s education leaders scrambling to make changes.

How important is it to have a role model?

A new working paper puts some numbers to that question.

Having just one black teacher in third, fourth or fifth grade reduced low-income black boys' probability of dropping out of high school by 39 percent, the study found.

And by high school, African-American students, both boys and girls, who had one African-American teacher had much stronger expectations of going to college. Keep in mind, this effect was observed seven to ten years after the experience of having just one black teacher.

When President Obama took office in January 2009, the country was on edge, the economy in free-fall. The federal education law, known as No Child Left Behind, was also in need of an update after earning the ire of teachers, parents and politicians alike. In short, there was much to do.

In time, that update would come, but President Obama's education legacy begins, oddly enough, with his plan to bolster the faltering economy.

Race To The Top

Grading Ohio's College Graduation Rates

Apr 15, 2013

10:00 As part of his latest budget proposal, Governor Kasich promised to provide incentives for Ohio colleges with the highest graduation rates. Ohio State would see a $10 million increase; Bowling Green could face a $2.8 million cut. This hour of All Sides asks if degree completion is a mark of a university's quality, and if more degrees are the key to increasing our national standing.  Guests