government

Houleye Thiam, a Mauritanian immigrant, is working to educate Columbus' African community about the 2020 Census.
Gabe Rosenberg / WOSU

Efforts are underway in Ohio for the 2020 Census, the U.S. government's once-a-decade effort to count every resident in the country. Mailers will begin showing up on doorsteps as early as next month, with a national Census Day planned for April 1.

Redlands, Calif., is known for its orange groves, its Victorian homes, and its small-town feel. Sixty miles east of Los Angeles, the city is home to about 75,000 people. But that number is expected to get a lot bigger.

"Redlands is already changing," says Mayor Paul Foster, "and this is just more of the future that's coming."

Updated on Feb. 12 at 6:42 p.m. ET

In these final weeks before the 2020 census is rolled out to the entire U.S., the federal government is under pressure to hire and train around a half-million door knockers and other temporary workers by this spring.

Chelsea Beck / NPR

President Trump is delivering the 2020 "State of the Union" address, which comes under the shadow of his impeachment trial. Watch his remarks live and follow a live annotation of his remarks, including fact checks and analysis from NPR reporters.

Mayor Andrew Ginther announces the selection of Tom Quinlan as the new Chief of Columbus Police, on Tuesday, Dec. 17, 2019.
Adora Namigadde / WOSU

The city's Community Safety Advisory Commission says that Columbus Police should establish an independent civilian review board to oversee any investigations into officer use-of-force, police shootings, citizen complaints and misconduct.

Franklin County Municipal Courthouse
Courthouses.co

Columbus and Franklin County officials say a new municipal courthouse downtown may go up across the street from the current courthouse.

Austin Place development just west of the Hilltop. Columbus is struggling to build enough housing to accomodate its rapidly growing population.
Adora Namigadde / WOSU

The U.S. Small Business Administration hosted a conference Wednesday to discuss how Central Ohio residents can benefit from "opportunity zones"—a federal tax benefit approved in 2017.

EPA's 'Secret Science' Rule

Jan 22, 2020
Acid mine drainage can cause creeks to turn a dark orange hue.
Curren Sheldon / 100 Days In Appalachia

The Trump Administration is working on a policy change that would require scientists to disclose all of their raw data, including confidential medical records, before their findings could be considered in shaping regulations.

News organizations and journalists' advocates are challenging restrictive new ground rules for reporters assigned to cover the Senate impeachment trial.

Correspondents who submit to an official credentialing process are granted broad access throughout the Capitol complex and usually encounter few restrictions in talking with members of Congress or others.

But now Senate Sergeant-at-Arms Michael Stenger has imposed new requirements for the impeachment trial, negotiated in part with Republican leadership:

Ohio Senate and Ohio House signs at the Ohio Statehouse.
Dan Konik / Statehouse News Bureau

Starting on Thursday, every committee hearing at the Ohio Statehouse will be streamed live or recorded and broadcast later.

Cuyahoga County may make it easier for employees to report whistleblower complaints within county government.

County council gave a first reading to revised reporting safeguards Monday evening.

Councilman Dale Miller, a Democrat who introduced the measure, said it grew out of talks with county Inspector General Mark Griffin. The changes are intended to give potential whistleblowers more comfort in coming forward with complaints, Miller said.

Money in a tip jar.
Miguel A. Padrinan / Pexels

When the clock strikes midnight on New Year’s Eve, Ohio’s lowest paid workers will have a special reason to celebrate. 

City leaders reveal the results of a small business assessment.
Adora Namigadde / WOSU

Columbus officials on Wednesday shared the results of an assessment of small business economic development in the city.

Christopher Columbus statue in front of Columbus City Hall.
Gabe Rosenberg / WOSU

Columbus City Council won’t hold its regular hearing Monday evening, but members are hosting a series of public hearings this week to touch base with residents ahead of the New Year.

Debbie Holmes

In Clintonville, a 100-year-old pin oak tree towers in front of Maureen Keyhani’s home on Arden Road. The tree sits in what is called a curb lawn between the sidewalk and the curb, and its knotted roots extend to the street.

Keyhani and her neighbors love the tree, so it was a surprise when Keyhani received a notice that the city of Columbus wanted to cut it down.

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