Frank LaRose

Debbie Holmes / WOSU

The Ohio Secretary of State is in the process of removing more than 200,000 voter registrations from the rolls, although he's making some last-minute exceptions to the purge.

Ohio I Voted Stickers
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Tens, and maybe hundreds, of thousands of Ohio voter registrations identified as inactive will be deleted Friday by local boards of elections.

The early voting center at the Franklin County Board of Elections in Columbus.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

A federal court has ruled Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose can remove more than 200,000 voters from the rolls Friday as planned. The Ohio Democratic Party had asked the court to block it, saying thousands of voters could be improperly removed.

Secretary LaRose (right) showing a resident the new machine at National Church Residences in Columbus.
Nick Evans / WOSU

Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose says it’s up to the courts whether the state can enforce its deadline to clean up the voter rolls.

voting booths
John Minchillo / Associated Press

With the ink barely dry on a new settlement between the ACLU of Ohio and the Secretary of State's office, the Ohio Democratic Party is filing its own lawsuit over state’s voter removal process.

The early voting center at the Franklin County Board of Elections in Columbus.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

In this week's episode of Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU, hosts Mike Thompson and Steve Brown talk about the ongoing battle over how Ohio maintains its voter rolls. Jen Miller, executive director of the League of Women Voters of Ohio, joins the show.

Ohio I Voted Stickers
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Ohio voters purged from the rolls will be allowed to cast provisional ballots in elections through 2022, following an agreement between the ACLU of Ohio and the Secretary of State's Office.

Ohio I Voted Stickers
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Last week, voting rights activists said about 4,000 voters were wrongly placed on a list of 235,000 registrations provided by counties that were set to be removed or “purged” from the rolls next month. Ohio’s top election official says that’s not true, and in fact more people are now active voters. 

The early voting center at the Franklin County Board of Elections in Columbus.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

More than 235,000 Ohio voters are on a list to be removed from the voter rolls in a little over two weeks.

Debbie Holmes / WOSU

The Ohio Democratic Party is calling for a halt to the Secretary of State’s pruning of the voter rolls. The party wants an investigation into the process after mistakes in Franklin County where 1,251 voters were incorrectly flagged for removal.

Over 235,000 Ohioans Could Be Purged From Voter Rolls

Jul 30, 2019
Secretary LaRose (right) showing a resident the new machine at National Church Residences in Columbus.
Nick Evans / WOSU

County boards of elections have mailed last-chance notices to more than 235,000 Ohioans who could be purged from state voter rolls.

The 2019 St. Patricks Day Parade in Cleveland.
Erik Drost / Flickr

Ohio’s top elections official wants county election leaders to be proactive in planning for the 2020 Presidential Primary, especially since it’ll take place on March 17, St. Patrick’s Day. Which means voters may see some changes.

Ohio I Voted Stickers
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Nearly two dozen groups and individuals are asking Ohio’s top elections official for a list of voters who could be dropped from the rolls this fall, so they can try to get them re-registered.

Ohio Sec. of State Frank LaRose is implementing a new voter registration form for Ohioans who are about to be removed from the rolls.
Ohio Senate

Ohio's Republican elections chief says the state can handle having its presidential primary on St. Patrick's Day next year if lawmakers make that change in the still-unsettled state budget.

Ohio I Voted Stickers
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose has told House Democrats that county officials are prepared to successfully administer elections no matter what the day. 

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