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Fordham Institute

Licking Heights High School freshmen take notes in a World History class taught by Amy Obhof..
Andy Chow / Ohio Public Radio

After lawmakers have spent years making tweaks and changes to the high school graduation requirements, the incoming freshman class is beginning its high school journey with what are believed to be permanent standards.

graduating students
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Business groups, higher-wealth districts and a charter schools organization are backing a new proposal for Ohio high school graduation requirements.

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A new school funding formula proposed by two state lawmakers would cost a billion dollars more than the current K-12 formula. That proposal also didn't include money for charter schools.

A classroom at Cleveland's John Hay High School.
Ashton Marra / Ideastream

A proposed new school funding formula would cost Ohio $720 million more than the current K-12 budget. But it doesn’t include funding for charter or community schools, which the state spent more than $880 million on last year.

Charter school advocates are calling on lawmakers to bump up their funding for facilities. They say the money now going to charters falls well below what they need. But critics say more changes should be made before a funding increase. 

A new study by advocates for school choice shows charter schools in urban areas are underfunded. The group is making the case at the same time Gov. Mike DeWine and lawmakers are coming up with a new two-year state budget. 

A classroom at Cleveland's John Hay High School.
Ashton Marra / Ideastream

An Ohio Senate committee has approved "alternate pathways" to graduation for high school seniors and juniors who are not on track to earn their diploma through the current method of using standardized test scores.

School bus
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The state has a lot of work to do to meet its self-imposed goal of 65 percent of working-age adults holding college degrees or industry certificates by 2025. That’s the conclusion of an analysis of the state’s school report cards by a pro-charter school group.

White Hat Management, the once-prolific Ohio charter school operator and early advocate for school choice in the state, is leaving the charter school business.

The company has been steadily losing contracts over the past few years in the competitive market.

Chad Aldis with the pro-charter research group Thomas B. Fordham Institute said the company’s exit is symbolic of the state’s charter school industry.

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Two national education advocacy groups say Ohio could be doing better when it comes to its annual school report cards. Both groups say they’re too complicated.

apple on a stack of textbooks
Pixabay

Nearly one-third of teachers in Ohio's traditional public schools are chronically absent, but the rate in charter schools is significantly less. That’s according to a report released this week by the right-leaning Thomas B. Fordham Institute, a Washington, D.C.-based think tank that operates more than a dozen charter schools in the state.

graduating students
Google Creative Commons

Ohio’s high school juniors may head into their summer break uncertain about what they need to do to earn a high school diploma. At the moment, they must reach a certain score on seven end of course tests. But that is likely to change.

High schools around the state are facing a crucial dilemma as about a third of students are not on track to graduate. That’s based on the new graduation standards that begin with the class of 2018. Now leaders are moving quickly to find a way to remedy the approaching crisis.

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A pro-school choice group says Ohio’s new laws to create oversight and transparency on charter schools are working. The study claims that the law is weeding out the bad schools.

State Board of Education member Tess Elshoff wrote the resolution to create a work group for further study.
Mark Urycki

The State Board of Education is holding off plan to enforce strict new graduation requirements for high school students. The change came when local school superintendents said nearly 30 percent of students may not make it.

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